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Baby Feeding Chart – How Many Ounces By Age0

Baby Feeding Chart - How Many Ounces by Age

As newborns, babies seem to eat, sleep and poop all day, every day. But, as your baby gets older, you may be wondering how much your baby should be eating, how often, and how many ounces by age. Keep in mind that milk should be your baby’s primary form of nutrition for the first year. Even after you’ve begun to offer solid foods, your baby’s milk intake should not decrease much, if at all. Also, babies are very good at self-moderation, so it is usually unnecessary to limit your baby’s milk intake for fear of him or her becoming overweight. Your baby’s growth and development depend on a large consumption of fat and calories.

These baby feeding charts for breastfeeding babies, formula-fed babies, and solids will help guide you to know if your baby is eating enough and how to help your baby sleep through the night sooner rather than later. You may want to bookmark this page for future reference or pin it on Pinterest.

Quick Links:

Breastmilk Amounts by Age
Formula Amounts by Age
Solid Food Amounts by Age


Breastmilk Feedings and Amounts by Age

All breastfed babies need between 20-35 ounces of breast milk per day, on average. In younger newborns and up to 2-3 months old, your baby should breastfeed on-demand, which usually means every 2-3 hours.

If you are pumping, breastmilk bottles vary in size from 3 to 6 ounces, usually, with 4 ounces being the average size once a baby is at least 3-4 months old. Keep in mind that some babies simply have larger appetites than others. The most important aspect is that your baby’s weight gain stays on his or her growth curve. Do not withhold milk from your baby in fear he or she will become overweight. Babies are very good at self-moderation and should be fed when hungry.

Keep in mind that the number of times your baby breastfeeds in a 24-hour period will depend on the combination of a) how much milk your baby can hold in their stomach (i.e. stomach capacity), b) how much milk you can store in your breasts (which has nothing to do with breast size), and c) your baby’s personality as well as if they have any digestion issues such as reflux.

We find babies who have reflux tend to eat more frequent, smaller meals. Also, some baby’s personalities are to overfill themselves while others eat until content and stop. My two boys were different than one another. While my first son would only ever eat 4-ounce bottles when we weren’t breastfeeding, his brother would take up to 5 to 5 1/2 ounce bottles at times. They were just different and even as my first son got older, he would simply NOT overeat or overfill his stomach and is still this way to this day.

Here is a handy baby feeding chart with breastmilk amounts by age, though keep in mind that many breastfeeding mothers feed their babies on-demand throughout their breastfeeding journey. This is just a rough guide to consider, especially if you feel like you are having to feed your baby excessively given his or her age.

If you ever have any concerns about your baby and your baby’s feeding habits, please be sure to seek out a healthcare provider and/or lactation consultant.

Age # of feedings per day / 24 hours Feeding Frequency Average Bottle Sizes (if applicable) Night Feedings
0-4 weeks on-demand on-demand* ~2-3 ounces / 60-90 ml on-demand
5-8 weeks on-demand every 2-3 hours** ~2-4 ounces / 60-120 ml 3-4
9-12 weeks/3 months ~8-10 every 2-3 hours 3-4 ounces / 90-120 ml 2-3
13-16 weeks/4 months ~6-10 every 2-3 hours 3-4 ounces / 90-120 ml 2-3
5 months ~6-10 every 2-3 hours 3-4 ounces / 90-120 ml 2, maybe 3
6 months ~6-9 every 3 hours 4-5 ounces / 120-150 ml 1-2
7 months ~5-8 every 3-4 hours 4-6 ounces / 120-180 ml 1-2
8 months ~5-8 every 3-4 hours 4-6 ounces / 120-180 ml 1, maybe 2
9 months ~5-8 every 3-4 hours 4-6 ounces / 120-180 ml 1
10 months ~4-6 every 3-4 hours 4-6 ounces / 120-180 ml 0-1
11 months ~4-6 every 3-4 hours 4-6 ounces / 120-180 ml 0
12 months ~4-6 every 3-4 hours 4-6 ounces / 120-180 ml 0

* If your baby goes longer than 4 hours without eating, be sure to wake him or her to feed them.

** Many newborns cluster feed in the evenings, which means they may nurse every hour for several hours or practically remain on the breast for several hours. Some say they are “tanking up” for the night.

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Formula Feeding Amounts by Age

Formula fed infants typically need 2 1/2 ounces or 74 ml of formula for each pound of weight, on average. Some babies have larger appetites than others, though. I have worked with a lot of families, personally, and some babies take small bottles and consume around 24 oz a day total while others consume over 30 oz. The most important thing to remember is that your baby should stay on his or her own growth curve.

In the newborn days, it’s important to feed your baby on-demand whenever he or she shows signs of hunger. As your baby grows older, you can consider putting your baby on a schedule.

While some parents and babies thrive on schedules, some people prefer to allow the daily routine to be flexible. Keep in mind that the more your baby eats during the day, the sooner your baby will sleep through the night.

Here is a formula-feeding chart to tell you the average frequency and bottle sizes of formula by age, but keep in mind that some babies eat a variable amount at different times of the day. You should use this chart simply as a guide while also adapting your daily routine to fit your unique baby.

If you ever have any concerns about your baby and your baby’s feeding habits, please be sure to seek out a healthcare provider and/or lactation consultant.

Age # of feedings per day / 24 hours Feeding Frequency Average Bottle Size Night Feedings
0-4 weeks on-demand on-demand* ~2-4 ounces / 60-120 ml on-demand
5-8 weeks 6-7 every 3 hours ~4 ounces / 120 ml 2-3
9-12 weeks/3 months 5 every 3 hours 4-6 ounces / 120-180 ml 2, maybe 3
13-16 weeks/4 months 5 every 3-4 hours** 4-6 ounces / 120-180 ml 1-2
5 months 4-5 every 3-4 hours 6-7 ounces / 180-210 ml 1-2
6 months 4-5 every 3-4 hours 6-8 ounces / 180-240 ml 0-1
7 months 4-5 every 3-4 hours 6-8 ounces / 180-240 ml 0***
8 months 4-5 every 3-4 hours 6-8 ounces / 180-240 ml 0
9 months 4-5 every 3-4 hours 6-8 ounces / 180-240 ml 0
10 months 3-5 every 3-4 hours 6-8 ounces / 180-240 ml 0
11 months 2-4 every 3-4 hours 6-8 ounces / 180-240 ml 0
12 months 2-3 every 3-4 hours 6-8 ounces / 180-240 ml 0

* If your baby goes longer than 4 hours without eating, be sure to wake him or her to feed them.

** Not all babies get to 4 hours between milk feedings by this age or ever. Some babies will always eat every 3 hours until 9-10+ months old.

*** Some formula-fed babies still eat at night even past 6 months old, especially if they have reflux.

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Solid Foods by Age

As you start solids, your baby’s milk intake should not decrease much, if at all, until 10+ months old when he or she is eating 3 solid meals per day plus one snack. For the first year, solid food is a lot about practice and introducing a variety of flavors and textures. Keep in mind that until your baby is consuming significant amounts of solid food, starting solids won’t necessarily help your baby sleep. In fact, so many sleep problems have nothing to do with hunger that starting solids doesn’t change sleep whatsoever.

Here is a baby feeding chart for solid foods. Keep in mind that if you are practicing baby led weaning, whether by choice or because your baby doesn’t like pureed foods, your baby will likely consume a lot less solid food than other babies his or her age. That is just fine as milk should still be your baby’s primary source of nutrition.

Age Grains
(per day)
Fruit
(per day)
Vegetables
(per day)
Meat and Dairy
(per day)
Birth-5 months None None None None
6 months (1 solid feeding per day) 1-2 tablespoons dry infant cereal, mixed with breastmilk or formula 1-2 tablespoons pureed fruit 1-2 tablespoons pureed vegetables None
7-8 months (2 solid feedings per day) 1-6 tablespoons dry infant cereal, mixed with breastmilk or formula 1-6 tablespoons pureed/mashed fruit 1-6 tablespoons pureed/mashed vegetables Meat: 1-2 tablespoons pureed/mashed protein (offer at 8 months)
Dairy: 1/4-1/2 cup yogurt or cottage cheese; 1 oz. shredded cheese
9-10 months (3 solid feedings per day) 2-4 tablespoons dry infant cereal, mixed with breastmilk or formula.
1-2 servings other grains*
4-8 tablespoons mashed/chopped fruit 4-12 tablespoons mashed/chopped vegetables Meat: 2-6 tablespoons mashed/chopped protein
Dairy: Same as 7-8 month recommendations.
11-12 months (3 solid feedings per day) Same as above, except increase “other grains” to 2 servings 6-8 tablespoons mashed/chopped fruit, or 1/2 cup diced 6-12 tablespoons mashed/chopped vegetables, or 1/2 – 3/4 cup diced Meat: 2-6 tablespoons mashed/chopped protein, or 1/4 cup diced
Dairy: Same as 7-8 month recommendations.

* 1 serving of “other grains” = 1/2 slice of bread, 2 crackers, 1/2 cup Cheerios, or 1/2 cup whole wheat pasta

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Share your experience with feeding your baby!

When Can Babies Sleep With Blankets?0

Babies can use wearable blankets from birth or as soon as you stop swaddling your baby. Your baby should not use loose blankets until they are at least a year old, however, you should not expect your child to keep a blanket on them for warmth while sleeping until at least 3-4 years old.

Let’s dig deeper about your baby and the use of blankets to ensure you keep your baby safe and warm.

Babies and Wearable Blankets

Once you transition away from swaddling, the best and safest way to put a blanket on your baby is to use a wearable blanket. This way, the blanket can’t come off as your baby sleeps, rolls around, or even stands up. Wearable blankets come in many different sizes from newborn to toddler sizes. You can even get size 3T-5T wearable blankets that allow your preschooler to walk around.

Usually, if you use a wearable blanket, you only need to put your baby in a onesie and pajamas underneath. You don’t want him or her to overheat, so don’t put on too many layers. Your climate as well as the current season may become a factor as well. You may want to check your baby’s sleeping bag’s TOG rating to make sure you have the room temperature correct with the wearable blanket you plan to use. For warmer temperatures, you may want to consider a Muslin sleep sack. Alternatively, using a 4-season Merino Wool wearable blanket would let you avoid needing to buy multiple blankets for different seasons. This takes the worry away that you will use the wrong blanket for your baby and prevents overheating.

Babies and Loose Blankets

As a safety precaution, The AAP recommends that you avoid loose bedding and blankets for the first year. This is, of course, because your baby may pull the blanket over his or her head and become entangled and unable to take it off. This can lead to accidental suffocation. So, it is strongly recommended that you not use a loose blanket to cover up your baby until at least a year old. Keep in mind, however, that most children won’t keep a blanket on all night until they are at least 3 years old unless they happen to be very still sleepers. Most children are active sleepers, however, so unless you have your room temperature set at a comfortable setting even without a blanket, continue to use a wearable blanket until your child is old enough to keep it on.

Babies and Blankets as a Comfort Item or Lovey

What about a small blanket? Can you give your baby a small blanket to hold on to as a security blanket?

Again, The AAP strongly recommends that you avoid any loose objects at all in the crib until at least one year old. Some babies and toddlers do benefit from a comfort item, or baby lovey. So, when you’re comfortable giving your baby a lovey, you can consider a small blanket that isn’t used for warmth but as an attachment object.

Attachment objects allow your baby or toddler to seek it out for comfort, whether at home or while traveling. Many items can become a lovey such as a toothbrush, mommy’s shirt, a car, a book, and pacifiers often become attachment objects. A security blanket is the most commonly known lovey. Depending on your age, you may remember The Peanuts character, Linus, who clutched his security blanket.

A popular type of lovey blanket is one with tags, so if you have a tactile baby, he or she can touch the tags and my son even liked to put his fingers through the loops. There are many different variations of these blankets, some with teethers and crinkle noises for playtime. Of course, if you are trying to encourage sleep, consider a quieter version like this Taggies blanket.

Other Blanket Safety Considerations

Whether you are using a baby blanket for warmth or comfort or both, do keep safety in mind. We don’t want blankets that are coming apart as they can be a choking hazard. We don’t want blankets with pieces that can fall off like a button or similar. The blanket should not present a suffocation hazard, so even if you have a baby who is over a year old, consider how large the blanket is and the size of your child.

TIP: Once you do find a blanket that you and your child loves, consider buying a second one that can be used during washes, in case of loss, or to lengthen use due to wear and tear! Having a backup can be even more important if your baby goes to daycare or takes their blanket with them often. There’s nothing worse than getting to bedtime and realizing you don’t have your baby’s favorite blankie!

When did your baby start using a blanket?

5 Tips to Find the Best Crib Mattresses0

Choosing the right crib mattress is one of the most important decisions you’re going to make for your baby as they spend most of their day in it.

It’s where they sleep, play and, even eat sometimes. This is by no means an easy task as there are simply so many different types and brands of products in the market and it could get confusing.

When it comes to crib mattresses, it’s not always clear what is good or bad. However, if you know what you should be looking for, you can make the process a lot simpler.

Here are 5 tips to find the best crib mattress:

  1. Size and safety

    In this case, these two go hand in hand. The mattress you buy should perfectly fit into the crib. If it’s too small and there are gaps between the crib and the mattress, your baby might end up getting his/her hand stuck inside and get hurt.

    Make sure the mattress has also never used before as it might contain germs from the previous use.

    If you’re worried about the mattresses having unsafe chemicals, you can always opt for a mattress made of organic materials.

    But, always ensure that it’s a newly manufactured mattress that perfectly fits the dimensions of your crib.

  2. Quality

    Look for the best quality material. Most modern high-quality mattresses come with very thick covers that are soft but also firm and have tear resistance.

    The types of mattress foam and innerspring are both extremely good but foam mattresses are generally much lighter and easier to maintain. And, it’s a nice option for both crib and toddler bed mattress.

    If you’re going for innerspring, you will have to consider the number of layers and the material with which those layers are made.

    These don’t always have to be whatever is offered at the highest price but it is recommended to look at all the options of materials before deciding on the optimal number of layers and material you prefer in your mattress.

    Also, make sure the mattress is at least semi-waterproof as there are going to be a lot of leaks, both from the baby and outside.

  3. Use proper covers

    The mattresses come with different kinds of covers. These covers serve various purposes like maintaining proper airflow, water resistance, and is anti-bacterial.

    Sometimes having a fully water-resistant cover might prevent proper air flow as there will be no air-ducts. This will lead to excessive sweating and heat, making the baby very uncomfortable.

    So, make sure the mattress has covers that allow for proper airflow around the baby so that the temperature stays low enough and any moisture is absorbed.

  4. Cost and warranty

    While higher cost doesn’t always equate to higher quality, try not to compromise on any of the basic features like water resistance and air flow.

    Crib mattresses, if not insulated with proper covers are prone to early damages because they have to deal with babies.

    Having to buy another crib mattress because of that will certainly cost you a lot more than investing in one high-quality mattress.

    Another thing to keep in mind when it comes to crib mattresses is that higher quality always outweighs a higher warranty tag.

    Most of the warranty tags here are marketing gimmicks as they attract you with higher warranty while compromising on the quality of the material.

    Always choose one that meets all your requirements of quality and features before considering either warranty or price.

  5. Explore and test

    Always go around looking for more and better options. You might be surprised to find a much better deal around some corner you never thought of visiting.

    Once you feel like you have a basic idea of what you want to buy, look online for reviews of similar products from customers who already bought them or head to the store yourself and test it out.

    Reading about the technical details might give you some understanding of what the product might offer but the only way to know if it really suits your baby is to actually feel it yourself. If possible, let your baby explore it as well. See how he/she reacts to it.

Hopefully, these 5 tips to find the best crib mattress will help you do just that so that neither you nor your baby have to face unnecessary inconveniences.

When Do Babies Eat Solid Foods In A Day?0

You know when and how to start your baby on solids.  You’re familiar with the types and amounts of foods your baby can eat, based on her age.  You’ve mastered the basics of cooking, pureeing, and storing homemade baby food.  Congratulations, baby food expert — you know a lot!

Something you may not be feeling to confident about, however, is when (during the course of a day) you should be offering your baby solids.  You likely eat breakfast, lunch, and dinner at roughly the same times each day, but is that schedule best for your baby?

Feeding Schedule Recommendations:  4-6 months

4-6 month old babies are just starting out on solids, so they’ll need smaller amounts of food, combined with large quantities of breastmilk and /or formula.  Also, it’s best to offer your baby solid foods after you’ve nursed or bottle fed him.  That way, he’s not too hungry when it comes time for a meal of solids, and that’ll prevent him from becoming frustrated and upset as he tries to eat.

Use the recommendations below to create a daily feeding schedule for your 4-6 month old baby:

  • Nurse and/or bottle feed as you normally would throughout the day (see our Amounts of Solid Foods By Age chart for recommended amounts of breastmilk and formula.)
  • After the first or second nursing or bottle feeding of the morning, offer your baby a solids meal (see our Types of Solid Foods By Age to determine what you can feed your baby.)  It’s best if babies just starting out on solids eat their food in the morning; that way, if baby has any digestive issues, they won’t disturb his nighttime sleep!
  • Optional:  After one of your afternoon nursings or bottle feedings, you can offer a second small meal of solid foods.
  • Total number of solid meals in a day: 1-2
  • Total amount of solid food your baby will eat in a day: 3-7 tablespoons

Feeding Schedule Recommendations: 7-8 months

7-8 month old babies are more accustomed to solid foods and can therefore handle larger amounts of foods.  You can also begin to increase the number of meals a day to 2-3.  Continue offering your baby plenty of breastmilk and/or formula, however; that’s still her primary source of nutrition.  And you should continue to try and nurse or bottlefeed your baby before you offer her a meal of solids (although that’s a little less essential now than it was a few months ago).

Use the recommendations below to create a daily feeding schedule for your 7-8 month old baby:

  • Continue to nurse and/or bottle feed throughout the day (see our Amounts of Solid Foods By Age chart for recommended amounts of breastmilk and formula.)
  • After the first or second nursing or bottle feeding of the morning, offer your baby a solids meal (see our Types of Solid Foods By Age to determine what you can feed your baby.)
  • After a late morning/early afternoon nursing or bottle feeding, offer your baby a second small meal of solids.
  • Optional:  After a late afternoon/early evening nursing or bottle feeding, offer your baby a third small meal of solids.
  • Total number of solid meals in a day: 2-3
  • Total amount of solid food your baby will eat in a day: 10-26 tablespoons (1/2 cup – 1 1/2 cups), plus 1 serving of dairy

Feeding Schedule Recommendations: 9-12 months

9-12 month old babies are solid food pros, and they’re definitely ready to handle 3 meals of solid foods each day.  Continue offering your baby breastmilk and/or formula (although he’ll start to need a bit less, now that he’s eating more solid food).  You can also offer your baby small amounts of water or juice.  It’s no longer necessary to nurse or bottlefeed your baby before you serve him a meal of solids, although you can certainly continue doing that if you prefer.

Use the recommendations below to create a daily feeding schedule for your 9-12 month old baby:

  • Continue to nurse and/or bottle feed throughout the day (see our Amounts of Solid Foods By Age chart for recommended amounts of breastmilk and formula.)
  • Before or after the first or second nursing or bottle feeding of the morning, offer your baby a solids meal (see our Types of Solid Foods By Age to determine what you can feed your baby.)
  • Before or after a late morning/early afternoon nursing or bottle feeding, offer your baby a second small meal of solids.
  • Before or after a late afternoon/early evening nursing or bottle feeding, offer your baby a third small meal of solids.
  • Total number of solid meals in a day: 3
  • Total amount of solid food your baby will eat in a day: 16-30 tablespoons (1 cup – 2 cups), plus 1-2 servings of other grains and 1 serving of dairy

For more help in creating a daily feeding schedule for your baby, check out these sample baby sleep and feeding schedules.

Everything You Need To Know About Starting Solids – All In One e-Book!

thumbnailWhat if you could find everything you needed to know about starting your baby on solid foods – when it’s best to start solids, how to introduce solids, complications, food allergies, etc. – in one easy-reference guide? Now you can! Your Baby’s Start To Solid Foods: A Comprehensive Guide will walk you through every step of starting solids. Plus, your e-Book package includes several bonus materials, designed to maximize your success in starting solids. You’ll get a thorough guide to treating constipation, a dietitian’s advice on how to avoid 5 common solid-foods mistakes, and a weekly meal plan for your baby’s first year. Grab your e-Book today, and ensure your baby has the healthiest possible start to solid foods!

What’s your baby’s daily feeding schedule?  Help out our other readers; share your sample schedules below!

5 Tips to Reduce Separation Anxiety in Babies0

As a young parent, you probably can’t imagine parting ways with your newborn even for a few hours. While those few first months you will be able to tend to your baby day and night,, the time will come when you will have to get back to work. After all, those diapers and formula are not going to pay for themselves. You know how hard separating from your baby will be – just imagine how hard it will be for them. However, this is quite a normal and healthy process, one that all babies go through. The only thing you can do is find some useful tips to help you reduce separation anxiety in babies, which we are more than happy to give!

Find a babysitter

Babies and toddlers depend on their parents for everything. From eating and drinking to bathing and falling asleep, a parent is on the job 24/7. In case you know that the time when you won’t be able to be next to your baby at all hours is approaching, it is the right time to ask for help. When looking for a person to tend to your child, it goes without saying that your first choice should be a family member. If you leave your baby with a person he/she is already familiar with, such as a grandparent, they won’t be as anxious.

But, contrary to the popular belief, not all grandparents sit around at home and take care of their grandchildren. Some are young and vivacious and don’t feel like spending 8 hours every day looking after a baby – which is perfectly fine. If that is the case, and you can’t find another family member to take care of your baby while you are not home, it’s time to look for professionals.  

The best case scenario would be to find a family member who could look after your baby.

Gradually introduce the babysitter in order to reduce separation anxiety in babies

You wouldn’t feel comfortable being stuck with a person you don’t know for hours, would you? Well, it is no different with babies. You have had months to bond with your newborn, and it was easy for you since you already have a bond that cannot be broken. But if you want to bring in a third person in your baby’s life, it’s best to do it gradually. Let your baby get to know the new babysitter a few times while you are present. Besides, this will also be helpful for you, as you will have a chance to witness what the babysitter is like. Knowing that your baby is safe will give you some peace of mind, and you know how important that is.

Leave when your baby is in a good mood

The timing is everything in life! Whatever we do and whichever decision we make, we always make sure that it is at the right time. We pick the right time to move our family across the state, we try to calculate when to make a large investment, and we ponder exactly at what moment to put our kids in daycare. Leaving for work while your baby is susceptible to experiencing separation anxiety should be no different. We know that you work from 9 AM and that you already have to be out the door at 8 AM. If that is the case, get up earlier than usual, and make sure you feed your baby and spend some time with him/her. They will handle you leaving much better if all of their needs have been taken care of.

The right timing can do wonders and reduce separation anxiety in babies.

Never forget to say goodbye

A lot of parents think they will reduce separation anxiety in babies by sneaking out of the house in the morning. Nothing could be farther from the truth. You should always, without an exception, kiss and hug your baby goodbye. Not only will it help them feel loved, but they will also get to see you leave and not feel like you just disappeared. Also, don’t forget to mention when you will be back, as that will give your baby something to look forward to. Sure, they may not be able to tell time just yet, but babies are more perceptive than you think.

Once you leave, don’t come back

You have already said your goodbyes and left through the doors. But you realized you forgot your keys, so you come back, the baby sees you and starts crying all over again. The opposite of reducing anxiety in babies will happen – they will just get more anxious since they will be confused and won’t know what’s going on. 

To prevent that from happening, make sure you double check everything before leaving. It’s wise to plan out your day in advance or pack your purse for tomorrow. This is not something that will take up too much of your time since it’s not exactly as if you are planning on moving for a job, but it will help you avoid the unpleasant situation we described a minute ago. 

Prepare everything for leaving, and make sure you don’t have to walk through those doors right after you left.

Other useful tips

  • Don’t suddenly leave your child with someone for 3 or more hours if you have never separated before.
  • Try to practice leaving by letting your baby spend a few minutes alone in the room.
  • To reduce separation anxiety in babies, you need to follow a routine. Always leave and come back at the same time (at least try to).

You won’t be able to make the separation anxiety completely go away. We, here at The Baby Sleep Site®, know the developmental process and its stages, so we know that this is something every baby has to go through. But what you can do is reduce separation anxiety in babies. And all you need for achieving that you have read in the last five minutes or so!

Newborn Sleep Schedules By Week0

Newborn Schedule by Week

Newborns generally eat, poop, and sleep around the clock in the early days, but what does a newborn’s sleep schedule typically look like? This post shares sample newborn sleep schedules by week.

You can peruse all the schedules by scrolling down or use the quick links below. You may also want to bookmark this page for future use or get more comprehensive sample schedules and schedule guidance in our e-book, Essential Keys to Your Newborn’s Sleep.

Quick Links
1 Week Old Schedule 9 Week Old Schedule
2 Week Old Schedule 10 Week Old Schedule
3 Week Old Schedule 11 Week Old Schedule
4 Week Old Schedule 12 Week Old Schedule
5 Week Old Schedule 13 Week Old Schedule
6 Week Old Schedule 14 Week Old Schedule
7 Week Old Schedule 15 Week Old Schedule
8 Week Old Schedule 16 Week Old Schedule

1 Week Old Schedule

A 1-week old will sleep upwards of 16-18+ hours in a day, but babies this age tend to sleep in “chunks” of 2 hours at a time and will need to eat that often. It is important to feed 1-week-old babies often to ensure proper weight gain and, if you’re breastfeeding, it helps establish your milk supply. So, even if your baby wants to sleep longer than 2 hours, you will need to wake him or her to feed. It’s very likely your baby will go right back to sleep after a feeding and diaper change quite a bit of the time. Or, at least, it might feel that way.

Another thing to keep in mind is that your baby’s “night sleep” will not be very long just yet. Late bedtimes are common at these younger ages and we often need to begin to correct day/night confusion.

Your 1-week-old’s schedule will not be set to a clock, but rather, you should feed your baby on demand and put your baby to sleep when they show sleepy signs. Babies this age, can barely stay awake every 45 minutes, usually, and eat every two hours. Here’s a bit how your day might look but it will vary quite a bit, baby to baby as well as day to day, and some naps will likely be longer than others:

1-Week-Old Schedule
Time Activity
7:00 AM Wake and Diaper Change
7:15 AM Milk
7:45 AM Nap
9:15 AM Milk and Diaper Change
9:30 AM Nap (goes right back to sleep after a feeding, possibly)
11:15 AM Milk and Diaper Change
12:00 PM Nap
1:15 PM Milk and Diaper Change
2:00 PM Nap
3:15 PM Milk and Diaper Change
3:30 PM Nap (goes right back to sleep after a feeding, possibly)
5:15 PM Milk and Diaper Change
6:00 PM Nap
7:15 PM Milk and Diaper Change
8:00 PM Nap
9:15 PM Milk and Diaper Change
10:00 PM Bedtime
11:15 PM Milk and Diaper Change
1:15 AM Milk and Diaper Change
3:15 AM Milk and Diaper Change
5:15 AM Milk and Diaper Change

A bit repetitive, but I promise things will get more interesting as your baby gets older. 😉

2 Week Old Schedule

A 2-week-old doesn’t differ too much from a 1-week-old in that your baby will sleep most of the day, approximately 16 hours, on average. But, again, the sleep is broken into “chunks” where some naps will be longer than others. If your baby still has day/night confusion, you may want to start trying to keep them awake for at least 45 minutes multiple times a day and avoid naps longer than 3 hours.

If your baby will only sleep when in your arms or chest, then the days may be challenging unless you have help at home. If your baby is sleeping in a bedside bassinet you may have more time on your hands than you thought you would after having a baby! If that’s the case, be sure to rest up for the coming weeks. 😉 Here’s a bit how your day might look but it will vary quite a bit, baby to baby as well as day to day, and some naps will likely be longer than others:

2-Week-Old Schedule
Time Activity
7:00 AM Wake and Diaper Change
7:15 AM Milk
7:45 AM Nap
9:15 AM Milk and Diaper Change
9:30 AM Nap (goes right back to sleep after a feeding, possibly)
11:15 AM Milk and Diaper Change
12:00 PM Nap
1:15 PM Milk and Diaper Change
2:00 PM Nap
3:15 PM Milk and Diaper Change
3:30 PM Nap (goes right back to sleep after a feeding, possibly)
5:15 PM Milk and Diaper Change
6:00 PM Nap
7:15 PM Milk and Diaper Change
8:00 PM Nap
9:15 PM Milk and Diaper Change
10:00 PM Bedtime
11:15 PM Milk and Diaper Change
1:15 AM Milk and Diaper Change
3:15 AM Milk and Diaper Change
5:15 AM Milk and Diaper Change

3 Week Old Schedule

At 3 weeks old, your baby may begin to stay awake a bit longer during the day up to one hour or so but still will need to sleep about 16 hours in a 24-hour period. He or she may also begin to become a bit fussier, in general. This is normal as babies sometimes have a hard time adjusting to the outside world. Their central nervous system is maturing and developing.

Talk to your baby’s doctor or healthcare provider to make sure you no longer need to wake your baby to feed. If your baby is gaining weight well, your doctor may allow him or her to sleep in longer stretches during the day and at night. Sometimes babies still feed frequently during the day at this age but then have at least one longer stretch at night. Your day may look a little something like this:

3-Week-Old Schedule
Time Activity
7:00 AM Wake and Diaper Change
7:15 AM Milk
8:00 AM Nap
9:15 AM Milk and Diaper Change
9:30 AM Nap (goes right back to sleep after a feeding, possibly)
11:15 AM Milk and Diaper Change
12:15 PM Nap
1:15 PM Milk and Diaper Change
2:15 PM Nap
3:15 PM Milk and Diaper Change
3:30 PM Nap (goes right back to sleep after a feeding, possibly)
5:15 PM Milk and Diaper Change
6:15 PM Nap
7:15 PM Milk and Diaper Change
8:15 PM Nap
9:15 PM Milk and Diaper Change
10:00 PM Bedtime
1:00 AM Milk and Diaper Change
3:00 AM Milk and Diaper Change
5:00 AM Milk and Diaper Change

Again, which naps are longer will vary baby to baby and maybe even day to day for the same baby.

4 Week Old Schedule / 1 Month Old Schedule

At 4 weeks old, your newborn baby will still need ~14-16 hours of sleep per day and will likely begin staying awake a bit more during the day. Some babies this age start to have one or two longer stretches of sleep at night. Talk to your baby’s doctor or healthcare provider to make sure you no longer need to wake your baby to feed. If your baby is gaining weight well, your doctor may allow him or her to sleep in longer stretches during the day and at night and it will be glorious! For breastfed babies, they sometimes feed more frequently than formula-fed babies at this age. For example, my son was breastfed and couldn’t go longer than 2 to 2 1/2 hours during the day before he needed to eat again while some formula-fed babies start to go 3 hours between feedings. Also, cluster feeding and evening fussiness may become more common around this age. Here is a common 4-week old sleeping pattern:

4-Week-Old Schedule
Time Activity
7:00 AM Wake and Diaper Change
7:15 AM Milk
8:00 AM Nap
9:45 AM Milk and Diaper Change
11:00 AM Nap
12:15 PM Milk and Diaper Change
1:15 PM Nap
2:45 PM Milk and Diaper Change
3:45 PM Nap
5:15 PM Milk and Diaper Change
6:15 PM Nap
6:45 PM Milk (Cluster Feed)
7:45 PM Milk (Cluster Feed)
8:15 PM Nap
8:45 PM Milk (Cluster Feed)
9:45 PM Milk and Diaper Change
10:00 PM Bedtime
2:00 AM Milk and Diaper Change
5:00 AM Milk and Diaper Change

As you can see, you may have one fewer night feeding and longer stretches of sleep (hopefully!)

5 Week Old Schedule

A 5-week-old will still need ~14-16 hours of sleep a day and can’t stay awake much longer than an hour. Some babies need more time to be able to stay awake longer, but 1 to 1 1/2 hours is typical. All babies develop at their own pace so if your baby is still sleeping almost the entire day, as long as your doctor isn’t concerned, it’s likely just fine. On the other hand, if your baby is staying awake a lot more during the day, this is also normal. Your baby will begin to stay awake more and more throughout the day as they can handle more stimulation. Here is what a 5-week-old schedule may look like, but again, it could vary quite a bit and you should still be putting your baby down based on his or her sleepy cues:

5-Week-Old Schedule
Time Activity
7:00 AM Wake and Diaper Change
7:15 AM Milk
8:15 AM Nap
9:45 AM Milk and Diaper Change
11:15 AM Nap
12:15 PM Milk and Diaper Change
1:30 PM Nap
2:45 PM Milk and Diaper Change
4:15 PM Nap
5:15 PM Milk and Diaper Change
6:30 PM Nap
7:00 PM Milk (Cluster Feed)
8:00 PM Milk (Cluster Feed)
8:15 PM Nap
8:45 PM Milk (Cluster Feed)
9:45 PM Milk and Diaper Change
10:00 PM Bedtime
2:00 AM Milk and Diaper Change
5:00 AM Milk and Diaper Change

6 Week Old Schedule

6-week-old babies typically need ~14-16 hours of sleep a day and will likely start gravitating toward a 4-5-nap schedule. The first nap is typically the first to organize and lengthen to become a more predictable nap. If your baby is fussy, this is typically the time when fussiness peaks. Your baby may be going through their 6-week growth spurt and will become a lot more social. Evening fussiness is still very common at this age and bedtimes often get a bit earlier but I still recommend avoiding bedtimes that are TOO early since babies this age don’t sleep 11-12 hours just yet. Here’s what a 6-week-old baby’s schedule may look like:

6-Week-Old Schedule
Time Activity
7:00 AM Wake, Diaper Change, and Milk
8:30 AM Nap
10:00 AM Milk and Diaper Change
11:30 AM Nap
1:00 PM Milk and Diaper Change
1:30/2:00 PM Nap
4:00 PM Milk and Diaper Change
4:30 PM Nap
6:30 PM Nap
7:00 PM Milk and Diaper Change
8:00/8:30 PM Milk (Cluster Feed)
8:30 PM Nap
9:45 PM Milk and Diaper Change
10:00 PM Bedtime
2:00 AM Milk and Diaper Change
5:00 AM Milk and Diaper Change

7 Week Old Schedule

Your 7-week-old newborn will still need ~14-16 hours of sleep each day and his or her schedule will likely look very similar to a 6-week-old’s. Your baby may begin to move bedtime earlier and drop one of their cluster feedings in the evening. Evening fussiness typically is going away around this age, though if your baby needs a couple more weeks, that would be within norms, too. Don’t worry! Your baby won’t likely remain so fussy unless he or she doesn’t get the sleep he or she needs. If you have any concerns, be sure to talk to your doctor and ensure proper weight gain is occurring. Here is a common 7-week-old’s daily routine:

7-Week-Old Schedule
Time Activity
7:00 AM Wake, Diaper Change, and Milk
8:30 AM Nap
10:00 AM Milk and Diaper Change
11:30 AM Nap
1:00 PM Milk and Diaper Change
1:30/2:00 PM Nap
4:00 PM Milk and Diaper Change
4:30 PM Nap
6:30 PM Nap
7:00 PM Milk and Diaper Change
8:30 PM Milk
9:00 PM Bedtime
2:00 AM Milk and Diaper Change
5:00 AM Milk and Diaper Change

A schedule is beginning to emerge! If your baby is sleeping a single 5-hour stretch, congratulations! This is considered “sleeping through the night.” Of course, you may not be sleeping all night just yet. Some babies, especially formula-fed babies, might be sleeping in even longer stretches at night. Some babies have increased their bottle sizes during the day while others haven’t. The key is that they are eating enough in a 24-hour period. Breastfed babies may still be eating three times a night.

8 Week Old Schedule / 2 Month Old Schedule

By 8 weeks old, many babies are sleeping longer at night and we start to see earlier and earlier bedtimes as your baby lengthens nighttime sleep to 11-12 hours and they nap 3-4 hours during the day, on average. They still need ~14-16 hours of sleep in a 24-hour period. However, if your baby still has a later bedtime, that isn’t too uncommon. Until your baby is sleeping 11-12 hours at night, you really don’t want an 8 PM or earlier bedtime else you will have to start your day WAY too early! In addition, your baby may have been eating just 1-2 times a night but once they lengthen their nighttime sleep, this might mean a night feeding creeps back in, temporarily.

Some babies are beginning to transition away from swaddling which can become problematic. This can lead to more night-waking and shorter naps. In addition, there is commonly an 8-week growth spurt to keep in mind.

Here is what your 8-week-old’s schedule may look similar to:

8-Week-Old Schedule
Time Activity
7:00 AM Wake, Diaper Change, and Milk
8:30 AM Nap
10:00 AM Milk and Diaper Change
11:00/11:30 AM Nap
1:00 PM Milk and Diaper Change
1:30/2:00 PM Nap
4:00 PM Milk and Diaper Change
5:00 PM Nap
7:00 PM Milk and Diaper Change
7:30 PM Bedtime
10:30 PM Fill-Up Feed / Dream Feed
3:30 AM Milk and Diaper Change

Please note: Not all babies, especially breastfed babies, can transition to just two night feedings by this age, especially if they are in bed 12 hours. Some babies are still getting three night feedings and that would be within averages.

9 Week Old Schedule

At 9 weeks old, your baby will need 11-12 hours of sleep at night and 3-4 hours during the day broken into 3-4 naps for a total of ~14-16 hours a day. This will be true for several weeks. Your 9-week schedule won’t likely look too different than your 8-week schedule. The frequency of schedule changes starts to slow down a bit as we approach 16 weeks. Here is a sample 9-week old schedule, though as always, babies vary a lot:

9-Week-Old Schedule
Time Activity
7:00 AM Wake, Diaper Change, and Milk
8:30 AM Nap
10:00 AM Milk and Diaper Change
11:00/11:30 AM Nap
1:00 PM Milk and Diaper Change
1:30/2:00 PM Nap
4:00 PM Milk and Diaper Change
5:00 PM Nap
7:00 PM Milk and Diaper Change
7:30 PM Bedtime
10:30 PM Fill-Up Feed / Dream Feed
3:30 AM Milk and Diaper Change

Please note: Not all babies, especially breastfed babies, can transition to just two night feedings by this age, especially if they are in bed 12 hours. Some babies are still getting three night feedings and that would be within averages.

10 Week Old Schedule

Your 10-week-old baby is likely starting to move bedtime a bit earlier if they haven’t done so already. It’s even more likely he or she is in bed 11-12 hours at night, now. 10-week-olds need an average of 14-16 hours of sleep in a 24-hour period and will likely be taking 3-4 naps a day, at this point. Here is a sample schedule for your 10-week-old:

10-Week-Old Schedule
Time Activity
7:00 AM Wake, Diaper Change, and Milk
8:30 AM Nap
10:00 AM Milk and Diaper Change
11:30 AM Nap
1:00 PM Milk and Diaper Change
2:00 PM Nap
4:00 PM Milk and Diaper Change
5:00 PM Nap
7:00 PM Milk and Diaper Change
7:30 PM Bedtime
10:30 PM Fill-Up Feed / Dream Feed
3:30 AM Milk and Diaper Change

Please note: Not all babies, especially breastfed babies, can transition to just two night feedings by this age, especially if they are in bed 12 hours. Some babies are still getting three night feedings and that would be within averages.

11 Week Old Schedule

11-week-old babies still need 11-12 hours of sleep at night and 3-4 naps, but the average total sleep tends to drop a bit at this age to ~14-15 hours. As we approach 3 months old, your baby is likely staying awake a bit more during the day and some naps may be starting to shorten. Here is what a day in the life of an 11-week-old might look like:

11-Week-Old Schedule
Time Activity
7:00 AM Wake, Diaper Change, and Milk
8:30 AM Nap
10:00 AM Milk and Diaper Change
11:30 AM Nap
1:00 PM Milk and Diaper Change
2:00 PM Nap
4:00 PM Milk and Diaper Change
4:30 PM Catnap
6:30 PM Milk and Diaper Change
7:00 PM Bedtime
10:30 PM Fill-Up Feed / Dream Feed
3:30 AM Milk and Diaper Change

Please note: Not all babies, especially breastfed babies, can transition to just two night feedings by this age, especially if they are in bed 12 hours. Some babies are still getting three night feedings and that would be within averages.

12 Week Old Schedule / 3 Month Old Schedule

12-week-olds (or 3-month-olds) are starting to approach the time when we start to see more sleep problems if you haven’t seen them up to this point. Naps sometimes get shorter and it may be harder to stick to your schedule or eat-play-sleep routine. Your baby still needs 11-12 hours of sleep at night and 3-4 hours during the day, but the total average sleep is right around 14 hours. Of course, by definition, some babies will need more and some will need less. If your baby needs less, developing a 3-month-old schedule is usually more difficult. Ideally, you’d keep your baby awake no longer than two hours at a time.

Here is what a typical schedule around this age looks like, though not always predictable just yet:

12-Week-Old Schedule
Time Activity
7:00 AM Wake, Diaper Change, and Milk
8:45 AM Nap
10:00 AM Milk
11:45 AM Nap
1:00 PM Milk
2:30 PM Nap
4:00 PM Milk
5:00 PM Nap
7:00 PM Milk
7:30 PM Bedtime
10:30 PM Fill-Up Feed / Dream Feed
3:30 AM Milk (formula-fed babies tend to drop this feeding around this age)

13 Week Old Schedule

Your 13-week-old’s schedule won’t be too different than a 12-week-old’s in that not much changes. Of course, as your baby gets older, he or she will be able to stay awake for progressively longer periods of time. Most babies this age will stay awake 1-2 hours at a time, with the first stretch being one of the shortest. Not all babies this age have 4 naps. Typically, those who take longer naps will have fewer naps, so it depends on whether your baby has started developing a consistent morning nap, yet. Your baby’s central nervous system is maturing and sleep is organizing. Here is a sample 13-week-old’s schedule:

13-Week-Old Schedule
Time Activity
7:00 AM Wake, Diaper Change, and Milk
8:45 AM Nap
10:00 AM Milk
11:45 AM Nap
1:00 PM Milk
2:30 PM Nap
4:00 PM Milk
5:00 PM Nap
7:00 PM Milk
7:30 PM Bedtime
10:30 PM Fill-Up Feed / Dream Feed
3:30 AM Milk (formula-fed babies don’t always need this feeding)

14 Week Old Schedule

At 14 weeks old, your baby still needs 11-12 hours of sleep at night and 3-4 hours during the day. Some babies are transitioning to 3 naps around this age, though not all, depending on how long they can stay awake between sleep periods. Most babies still need to sleep within 1-2 hours of being awake. And, if they are sleeping 12 hours at night, they may not need quite as much sleep during the day. Schedules are still coming together except for regular or predictable babies who naturally gravitate toward a schedule. Here is what your schedule might look like if your baby takes a longer midday nap:

14-Week-Old Schedule
Time Activity
7:00 AM Wake, Diaper Change, and Milk
9:00 AM Nap
10:00 AM Milk
12:00 PM Nap
1:00 PM Milk
4:00 PM Milk
4:30 PM Catnap
6:45 PM Milk
7:00 PM Bedtime
10:30 PM Fill-Up Feed / Dream Feed
3:30 AM Milk (formula-fed babies don’t always need this feeding)

15 Week Old Schedule

Your 15-week-old will not sleep too differently than 15 weeks old. Not too much will have changed from week-to-week, though all babies develop differently, so a 15-week old could look more like a 12-week-old or a 16-week-old and both would be “normal.” Not all babies will organize their sleep at the exact same time. Babies tend to be more predictable when they transition from 3 to 2 naps, but other nap transitions and schedule changes aren’t quite as predictable. Here is what some 15-week-old’s schedule looks like if they can’t stay awake very long between sleep periods and don’t take super long naps:

15-Week-Old Schedule
Time Activity
7:00 AM Wake, Diaper Change, and Milk
9:00 AM Nap
10:00 AM Milk
12:00 PM Nap
1:00 PM Milk
3:00 PM Catnap
4:00 PM Milk
5:00 PM Catnap
7:15 PM Milk
7:30 PM Bedtime
10:30 PM Fill-Up Feed / Dream Feed
3:30 AM Milk (formula-fed babies don’t always need this feeding)

16 Week Old Schedule / 4 Month Old Schedule

At 16-weeks-old, the main sleep problem we see is the famous 4-month-sleep regression. Babies tend to wake up frequently at night and take short naps after this regression begins. But, keep in mind, this can occur as early as 12 weeks old or as late as 5 months old. For some babies, they will go back to sleeping well while others will need more help learning how to sleep in longer stretches at night and take longer naps. If you haven’t already, this is often when visitors download our free e-Book, 5 Ways to Help Your Child Sleep Through the Night.

14-Week-Old Schedule
Time Activity
7:00 AM Wake, Diaper Change, and Milk
9:00 AM Nap
10:00 AM Milk
12:00 PM Nap
1:00 PM Milk
4:00 PM Milk
4:30 PM Catnap
6:45 PM Milk
7:00 PM Bedtime
10:30 PM Fill-Up Feed / Dream Feed
3:30 AM Milk (formula-fed babies don’t always need this feeding)

Well, this gives you some ideas about an appropriate schedule for your newborn, but keep in mind that all babies are unique and some are more predictable and easy-going than others. Spirited babies tend to be more challenging when it comes to schedules. Take heart that all babies do eventually get into a rhythm, though not all are predictable to the clock. You’ll get to know your baby and his or her unique needs.

What is your newborn’s sleep schedule?

Feeding Solid Foods To A Baby With Reflux: 5 Tips0


Reflux: it’s a problem that affects many babies (up to 50% of babies age 0-3 months!) And if your baby has ever struggled with reflux, you know how hard it can be — the gas, the vomiting, the constant fussiness.

Since reflux is a digestive issue, introducing solid foods to your baby will definitely have an impact on her reflux symptoms. Some parents find their babies’ reflux symptoms actually improve with the introduction of solid foods; others find that starting solids increases reflux symptoms like gas and vomiting.

5 Tips For Feeding Babies With Reflux

Does your baby struggle with reflux? Below, we’ve included 5 tips to help you feed solid foods to your baby with reflux.

Offer good “first foods”.

Rice cereal is usually considered a good first food for babies without reflux, and it may be fine for a baby with reflux, too. However, rice cereal has been known to cause constipation and gas in some babies, so you may want to avoid offering it right away, if your baby has reflux.

Instead, consider starting with these foods:

  • Avocado — Foods that are high in fat, like avocados, can be good for babies with reflux. Babies with reflux may eat less than babies without, so it’s considered good practice to offer them high fat, high calorie foods.)
  • Pears — Pears are one of the least acidic fruits, and since acid can trigger reflux, pears make a great first food for your baby.
  • Bananas — Bananas have been shown to actually help with digestion.

Avoid foods that are known to trigger reflux.

Foods that are known to cause gas can cause lots of pain and discomfort for a baby who already struggles with reflux. Those foods include:

  • Onions
  • Garlic
  • Broccoli
  • Cucumber
  • Brussel sprouts
  • Cabbage
  • Cauliflower
  • Corn

Other foods that have been known to increase reflux symptoms include:

  • Dairy products (particularly milk)
  • Acidic foods, like tomatoes and oranges
  • High-fat meats
  • Carbonated drinks (not that you should be offering those to your baby anyway! 😉 )

Stick to the 4 Day Rule.

Remember the 4 Day Rule? Essentially, the 4 Day Rule advises you to wait 4 days between introducing new foods to your baby. This allows you to figure out which (if any) foods your baby might be allergic to.

This rule works for babies with reflux, too. After you’ve offered your baby a new food, wait a few days to see if it triggers any reflux symptoms. This’ll make it much easier for you to uncover your baby’s “trigger foods” and keep those out of her diet as much as possible.

Offer frequent, small meals (but not too close to bedtime!)

Your baby will have an easier time digesting small quantities of food than larger ones. And for some babies, eating large meals triggers reflux symptoms. So consider creating your own daily feeding schedule that’ll include 4 or 5 (or even 6) small meals.

What’s more, avoid offering your baby any solids in the hour before bedtime. This’ll help ensure that if he does have any reflux symptoms after eating, they won’t interfere with his nighttime sleep.

Keep your baby upright.

If your baby’s struggled with reflux since birth, you probably know this one already. The fact is that keeping your baby in an upright position after feeding can actually help him digest food, and can help prevent vomiting. This is true for babies when they’re breastfeeding or bottle feeding; it’s also true for babies when they’re eating solid foods!

Sit babies upright when it’s time for a solids meal, and avoid laying them down flat on their backs (or their stomachs) after eating. It’s also recommended that you avoid placing your baby in a walker or exersaucer (or anything else that’ll put pressure on his stomach) after he’s eaten.

Everything You Need To Know About Starting Solids – All In One e-Book!

thumbnailWhat if you could find everything you needed to know about starting your baby on solid foods – when it’s best to start solids, how to introduce solids, complications, food allergies, etc. – in one easy-reference guide? Now you can! Your Baby’s Start To Solid Foods: A Comprehensive Guide will walk you through every step of starting solids. Plus, your e-Book package includes several bonus materials, designed to maximize your success in starting solids. You’ll get a thorough guide to treating constipation, a dietitian’s advice on how to avoid 5 common solid-foods mistakes, and a weekly meal plan for your baby’s first year. Grab your e-Book today, and ensure your baby has the healthiest possible start to solid foods!

Does your baby have reflux? Do you have any tips to offer on feeding solids to a baby with reflux? Share your story and advice!

*Some of this information was taken from homemade-baby-food-recipes.com.

How to Swaddle a Baby + 5 Tips For Better Sleep0

Swaddling your newborn can help keep your baby calm and content after he or she is born. But, how do you swaddle a baby and is there a step-by-step process to follow? Yes! This article will tell you how to swaddle a baby and give you 5 tips for better baby sleep.

What is Swaddling?

Swaddling is tightly wrapping your newborn baby in a blanket to give them a womb-like feeling. Some people say it’s like wrapping them up like a burrito.

But, how you swaddle a baby is important, otherwise your baby can break out of the swaddle blanket, which can be dangerous. A loose blanket is not safe for your baby in their bassinet or crib. Read on to learn how to master this important skill.

How to Swaddle a Baby Step-By-Step

Here’s how to swaddle a baby step by step:

  1. Lay a large receiving or another lightweight blanket on a flat surface with one corner of the blanket folded down.
  2. Lay your baby down so that his or her head is above the fold made in the first step.
  3. Take your baby’s right arm and position their hand close to their face or down by their side, depending on preference.
  4. Take the left side of the blanket and wrap it snugly over your baby’s right arm, lifting the right arm, and tuck the blanket underneath him or her.
  5. Take the bottom of the blanket and fold it up toward your baby’s chest, but do NOT cover the face.
  6. Now, hold your baby’s left arm to their side or up by their face and wrap the right side of the blanket snugly over and tuck it in underneath the other side of their body.

Please note: When you are wrapping the blanket around your baby, you want to do this snugly, so it’s hard for him or her to break out, but not so tight they are uncomfortable, of course.

Also note, there are MUCH easier ways to swaddle than this if you have the budget. Read below!

Video: How to Swaddle a Baby

For those who learn better by watching, here is a video of the swaddling process:

An Easier Way to Swaddle

Honestly, using a regular blanket is the hardest way to swaddle, especially as your baby gets older and stronger. Instead, I recommend using one of these products for WAY easier swaddling:

Miracle Blanket – This is the blanket we used, which made it much easier for me to swaddle the baby. My husband was pretty good with the regular blanket, but I could never get it tight enough.

Woombie Swaddling Blanket – Many of our clients rave about this product and it makes swaddling SO easy because all you need to do is zip it up and snap a button.

Love To Dream Swaddle UP – Again, our clients rave about this swaddling blanket, too. The nice thing is that you can “swaddle up” the babies hands as you begin to transition away from swaddling and leave their arms out.

Benefits of Swaddling a Baby

Many new parents wonder why bother swaddling at all. The benefits of swaddling include longer sleep durations, especially those that would otherwise be interrupted by the moro (or startle) reflex, prevents face scratching, and helps to maintain the back sleeping position. A swaddled baby has less anxiety and feels safer since it’s mimicking the womb.

When Should You Stop Swaddling?

Most babies stop being swaddled around 3-4 months old, but some as late as 6-9 months old. There are times you should definitely NOT swaddle your baby and they include:

  • If you are bed-sharing.
  • If your baby is rolling.
  • If your baby keeps breaking out leaving loose bedding in the crib.
  • If you are sleep training.

Need more details? See our post How and When To Stop Swaddling Baby

5 Tips For Better Sleep With the Swaddle

Finally, as promised, here are 5 tips to help your baby sleep better even while swaddled:

1. Keep awake time short

If your baby is 4 months or younger, be sure to keep him or her awake 1-2 hours TOPS. Over-tired babies have a much harder time staying asleep. As they get older, they can stay awake longer but still need to sleep within 2-3 hours at 5-6 months old.

2. Room Temperature

Keep your baby’s room temperature between 68-70 degrees Fahrenheit and don’t overdress your baby under the swaddle. A onesie usually suffices.

3. Play White Noise

Just like the swaddle mimics the womb, white noise can also help your baby sleep better by mimicking the womb.

4. Create a bedtime routine

By creating a consistent bedtime routine, you can cue your baby that sleep is on the horizon and prepare them for sleep. This can go a long way to setting the stage for a better night’s sleep or longer nap.

5. Sleep Begets Sleep

Some people might tell you to keep your baby awake more during the day so they sleep better at night, but that’s simply not often true. The only time that applies is if your baby is sleeping too much during the day or has day/night confusion. Otherwise, you’re better off giving your baby the “right” amount of daytime sleep and the “right” number of naps. Better sleep during the day gives you better sleep at night and better sleep at night gives you better daytime sleep. Sleep begets sleep.

Not sure how many naps or how much sleep your baby should be getting? Check out our Sample Sleep and Feeding Schedules!

What are your best tips for swaddling your baby?

Should You Use Organic Fruits and Veggies to Make Your Baby’s Food?0

When you make homemade baby food, it’s best to use the freshest produce possible (although using frozen fruits and vegetables is considered fine, too).  But there’s another factor to consider before buying produce for your baby:  organic or non-organic?

Facts About Organic Produce

The “organic” label can be applied to any produce that is grown using natural, non-synthetic pesticides or fertilizers and that isn’t highly processed.  Organic foods have gained lots of attention in recent decades, and have been praised as a healthier, more natural alternative to non-organic produce.

However, if you’ve ever done a price comparison, you know that that organic doesn’t come cheap!  Organic produce is anywhere from 20% – 100% more expensive than non-organic.  The reasons for these higher costs are many, and the higher costs themselves prevent many people from buying organic at all.  It’s estimated that only 10% of the American population buys only organic produce, simply because the cost is so high.

Comparing Organic and Non-Organic Foods

Of course, as parents, we want to give the best to our babies.  So, is the high price of organic produce worth it if it means healthier food for our little ones?  Or is it safe to stick with non-organic fruits and veggies?

The chart below offers some basic information to help you make your decision.

Factors to Consider Organic Fruits/Veggies Non-Organic Fruits/Veggies
COST Organic produce is significantly more expensive than non-organic. Non-organic produce is far less expensive than organic.
VARIETY You may be a bit limited if you buy organic. For example, it might be tough to find organic blueberries! However, as more and more stores carry organic produce, that will likely change. A wider variety of fruits and vegetables are available if you choose non-organic produce.
NUTRITION There’s conflicting research about whether or not organic produce is healthier — some studies indicate that it is, while others indicate that it’s nutritionally identical to non-organic. All fruits and veggies are considered nutritious, so there’s really no such thing as an “unhealthy” piece of produce! We all need to eat plenty of fresh produce, regardless of whether it’s organic or not.
SAFETY Organic produce is grown without synthetic, chemical pesticides, so people who eat it have less pesticide exposure than those who eat non-organic produce.  And since synthetic pesticides are considered toxins, this makes organic produce a slightly safer option. People who eat non-organic produce are more exposed to pesticide residue. Keep in mind, however, that non-organic produce has pesticide levels that are well-below what the FDA considers dangerous.
ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT* Organic produce is considered more environmentally-friendly than non-organic produce, since it uses more natural farming methods and processing. Non-organic produce is considered to be less “green” than organic, but see our note below for more details.

*NOTE: Many environmental experts advise that people who want to live a “green” lifestyle focus on eating local foods, rather than organic ones. Think of it this way: if you live in Boston, and you buy organic strawberries shipped from California, your food takes a huge amount of fuel to make its way to your shopping cart! Better to buy local strawberries (even if they aren’t organic) if your primary concern is the environment. Of course, if you can find local, organic produce, that’s perfect!

Should I Feed My Baby Organic Food?

So what do we make of all this information?  Here’s the bottom line, as we see it:  to help your baby stay as healthy as possible, feed her plenty of fresh fruits and vegetables.  Period.  Organic produce may be slightly healthier, so if you can afford the price, go for it!  But if buying organic is simply out of your budget’s reach, don’t lose a moment of sleep over it.

What if you can’t afford to switch entirely to organic but are still concerned about pesticide and chemical exposure?  Researchers recommend focusing on the “dirty dozen”:  these are 12 fruits and vegetables that tend to have the highest levels of pesticides.  When it comes to these fruits and veggies, buy organic; then, buy non-organic varieties of everything else.  This’ll help maximize your food budget while minimizing your baby’s exposure to pesticides.

The Dirty Dozen

  1. Apples
  2. Celery
  3. Strawberries
  4. Peaches
  5. Spinach
  6. Nectarines (imported varieties)
  7. Grapes (imported varieties)
  8. Sweet Bell Peppers
  9. Potatoes
  10. Blueberries
  11. Lettuce
  12. Kale/Collard Greens

Everything You Need To Know About Starting Solids – All In One e-Book!

thumbnailWhat if you could find everything you needed to know about starting your baby on solid foods – when it’s best to start solids, how to introduce solids, complications, food allergies, etc. – in one easy-reference guide? Now you can! Your Baby’s Start To Solid Foods: A Comprehensive Guide will walk you through every step of starting solids. Plus, your e-Book package includes several bonus materials, designed to maximize your success in starting solids. You’ll get a thorough guide to treating constipation, a dietitian’s advice on how to avoid 5 common solid-foods mistakes, and a weekly meal plan for your baby’s first year. Grab your e-Book today, and ensure your baby has the healthiest possible start to solid foods!

Organic? Non-Organic? A little bit of both? How do you decide what kind of produce to buy for baby?

9 Tips for Better Sleep in 20190

9 Tips for Better Sleep in 2019

Happy 2019, readers! You know what they say — new year, new start! Is your baby or toddler still struggling to take restorative naps, or maybe having a hard time sleeping through the night? Now is the time to take action! With some effort on your part (and some help from those of us here at The Baby Sleep Site®), 2019 really can be a year of peaceful sleep for your whole family.

To help you achieve that great sleep you’re looking for, here are 9 tips you can use to get started on improving your baby or toddler’s sleep, and to ensure that you have a well-rested year ahead!

9 Tips for Better Baby and Toddler Sleep in 2019

  1. Don’t put off sleep training because you think it’s “too early” or “too late”

    It’s true that there are ‘ideal windows’ for sleep training (and you can read more about those here). But regardless of how old your baby is and where they are in their sleep development, there is some part of their sleep you can be improving right now.

  2. Set Goals

    One great step you can make toward improving sleep is to set realistic, clear goals for your baby’s sleep. If you don’t know where you want to go, it’s very hard to find a path there, and too easy to become overwhelmed. Make sure that your goals are specific – instead of setting a goal like ‘sleep through the night’, try setting one like ‘down from 3 night wakings to 2 within first 10 days.’ Once you achieve that goal, you can find another small step forward until you reach great sleep!

  3. Have realistic expectations

    While we have helped some families achieve miraculous results in just one e-mail or phone call, that certainly isn’t our norm. Some families need 30 days of unlimited e-mails, and frequent tweaks to their Personalized Sleep Plans® before they see results. We aren’t miracle workers, but we keep working with you to find THE solution that works for YOUR family. Your baby is unique and may or may not respond as quickly as some of the lucky few who have success in one or two nights. So please, have realistic expectations for your baby. Know that it may take days or perhaps even a few weeks to see any improvement. If you are realistic, you will have less frustration and more success, since you are less likely to give up before he has time to learn. This is especially true for slow-to-adapt babies.

  4. Make A Plan!

    If you’re going on a road trip across country, most people make a plan. Some will plan it down to the last detail, including where they will stop for potty breaks, while others will make looser plans. If they make it to a city near their planned stop, they might choose to stop sooner or later, while others will do anything to stick to their plan and stop when and where they planned to stop no matter what. Neither of these types of plans are ‘better’ – they reflect the personality types of the people who made them. So, regardless of your personality type, remember that success usually starts with a plan (even if it’s not super-detailed). Now, as to how to get a sleep plan – we can personalize one for you, you can generate a custom sleep plan here, or if you like to ‘do-it-yourself’, you can access one of our general sleep plan templates and workbooks to get some help creating your own.

  5. Get Support From Your Village

    Whether you find a friend who’s going through a similar situation with their child’s sleep, or you have your partner/spouse, a friend on Facebook, your parent, or a Sleep Consultant from our sleepy little village helping you through, one thing that will help you succeed in making a big change in your life is your support network. Holding yourself accountable by “checking in” with someone will help you stick to your plan and work toward your goals. So, try to get your village lined up before you start!

  6. Stop comparing your baby to your friend’s baby

    It’s soooo frustrating when your friends around you all have babies who sleep great or did after five minutes of crying or something. Believe me, I know! But try not to believe the many “myths” your friends may tell you about sleeping through the night. And consider that a) not all people define “sleeping well” the same way (some might not mind replacing a pacifier three or four times per night, but you might), b) it doesn’t mean they won’t have different sleep issues later (babies change a lot in the first two years!) and c) all babies have easy and hard things about them (some might struggle with sleep and others with eating, for example).

  7. Make sure to lay the groundwork before you start sleep coaching

    There are a few things you should do before you start any kind of sleep training, including catching up on sleep (both you and your baby or toddler should do this) and possibly visiting your doctor. To read the full list and get the best start possible, check out 5 Things To Do Before Sleep Training.

  8. Stay Consistent

    So you set your goals and made your plan…but are you keeping with it? It’s an important point to remember! The number one key to successful sleep training is consistency. You have to give a plan time to work, and you have to faithfully stick to that plan before you’ll ever start to see progress. So don’t throw in the towel after just a few nights – instead, stick with it. If you haven’t seen any meaningful changes in 7-10 days, then consider making changes to your plan then, but not before.

  9. Take that first step

    Why is a bullet point about taking the first step the very last thing on our list? Because once you have your plan, taking that first step is often the hardest. Often we build up how terrible sleep training will be in our heads and, more often, it’s worse in our heads than in reality. We’re afraid we’ll be sleep training a tortoise and we’ll feel guilty because our baby won’t sleep and it’s our fault. The first step in solving any problem is usually the most difficult, but it’s also one of the most important.

What are your sleep-related plans for 2019? Any of you planning to sleep train? Feel free to ask questions and share your tips below – we love hearing from you!