Category Archives: Baby Sleep News RSS

How Long Do Newborns Sleep?0

Most newborns sleep the majority of the day and night, waking only to eat and dirty their diapers. But, is your newborn getting enough sleep a day? What about at night? This post will cover newborn sleep patterns and how long newborns sleep at various times in the day.

How Long Do Newborns Sleep a Day?

According to the AAP, newborn babies sleep an average of 16 to 17 hours a day over a 24-hour period but usually in 1-2 hour segments. And, according to The National Sleep Foundation, newborns sleep between 14 and 17 hours a day.

As a sleep consultant for over 10 years, I want to point out that there is quite a big difference between a 3-4-week old versus a 12-week old but both are considered a “newborn.” Sleep needs change rapidly and, therefore, you can expect your 3-4-week old to sleep more than your 12-week-old, for example.

This is one reason why we break down newborn sleep patterns by the week. If you compare a 1-week-old who is eating and sleeping virtually all day and night, you will see that a 6-week-old is awake much more.

It’s important to adjust your expectations as your baby grows and changes so you can make sure you are helping your newborn get the appropriate amount of sleep.

Can your baby sleep too much? The short answer is ‘yes’ but it’s highly unlikely. If your baby is healthy, they are likely sleeping the amount they need and babies need a LOT of sleep! If you are ever concerned, be sure to talk to your baby’s doctor, of course. The total amount of sleep in a 24-hour period will vary from baby to baby. Your baby’s average will stay relatively constant, though, meaning they will sleep approximately the same amount every day unless they are going through a growth spurt or have changed their habits.

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How Long Do Newborns Sleep at Night?

You might be researching newborn sleep patterns and begin to see things about making bedtime earlier. But, don’t do this too early! That’s because newborns will often sleep a maximum of 8-10 hours at night beginning around 6 weeks old, on average. After these 8-10 hours, they might stay awake for playtime for 1-2 hours at a time and you don’t want that to be 3:00 or 4:00 a.m.! Your newborn might stay awake from 3:30 to 5:00 a.m. and then take a 2-hour nap, for example. So, keep bedtime later until your baby extends their nighttime sleep to 11-12 hours which occurs around 3 months old.

Even though your newborn might sleep 8-10 hours at night, it’s important not to let them sleep through feedings until their doctor approves. This is usually after your baby has doubled their weight, established a good weight gain, and is growing appropriately. Every baby is different so be sure to get specific instructions from your doctor.

The newborn days are often the most exhausting for parents because you might be only sleeping in 1 1/2 to 2-hour chunks yourself but take heart it’s a relatively short period of time in your baby’s life! It only feels like years.

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How Long Do Newborns Sleep at a Time?

Now that we know how much newborns sleep in a day, we should discuss how long newborns sleep at a time. Some newborns will take long, luxurious naps for 2-3 hours at a time. Just be careful your baby doesn’t have day/night confusion. If that’s the case, you will want to limit naps to two hours maximum to help them sort this out. Otherwise, we will usually let newborns take long naps. Don’t worry, they will wake up soon enough!

On the other hand, some naps are short, lasting just 30-45 minutes sometimes. Don’t expect all naps to be long but you should expect at least 1-2 long ones and then the remainder are often shorter.

At night, newborns should be awakened to feed every two hours until their doctor tells you that your baby can sleep a longer stretch. Breastfed babies tend to wake every 2-3 hours to eat until at least 2-3 months old while formula-fed babies often go 3-4 hours.

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Sample Newborn Schedule

Putting it all together, here’s a sample 6-week-old baby sleep schedule so you can get an idea:

6-Week-Old Sleep Schedule
Time Activity
7:00 AM Wake, Diaper Change, and Milk
8:30 AM Nap
10:00 AM Milk and Diaper Change
11:30 AM Nap
1:00 PM Milk and Diaper Change
1:30/2:00 PM Nap
4:00 PM Milk and Diaper Change
4:30 PM Nap
6:30 PM Nap
7:00 PM Milk and Diaper Change
8:00/8:30 PM Milk (Cluster Feed)
8:30 PM Nap
9:45 PM Milk and Diaper Change
10:00 PM Bedtime
2:00 AM Milk and Diaper Change
5:00 AM Milk and Diaper Change

See more sample schedules here: Newborn Schedules By Week

Why Do Newborns Sleep So Much?

Newborns have to sleep so much primarily to grow. It takes a lot of energy to build muscles and for brain development. In addition, they have to process so much of what they see in the world. Remember, everything is brand new to them. Just like we adults might get over-stimulated and sleepy after an outing to an amusement park or party, babies need to recuperate from everything they see, hear, and learn during the day on top of all the growth that is happening!

How Long Should Your Baby Sleep in Your Room?

The AAP recommends that you share a room with your baby until 6-12 months, on average. It is important to note that they recommend “room-sharing without bed-sharing.” Sharing a room with your baby is considered the safest and can reduce the risk of SIDS. But, sharing a sleep surface can be dangerous. Always be sure to review the most up-to-date safe sleep recommendations.

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Conclusion

I hope this post has helped you learn more about newborn sleep patterns and will help you establish healthy sleep habits from a young age. Be sure to check out our free e-Books for more information about how you can help your family get better sleep!

References:

AAP Newborn Sleep Needs
AAP Sleep Needs by Age
Sleep Foundation Sleep Hours
Safe Sleep Recommendations

The post How Long Do Newborns Sleep? appeared first on The Baby Sleep Site – Baby / Toddler Sleep Consultants.

When Do Babies Drop to One Nap? 5 Signs to See Before You Switch to One Nap0

When to Drop to One NapAccording to different baby sleep books and websites out there, babies drop to one nap anywhere from 10 months to 24 months old. These wide age ranges and contradictions make it hard for parents to figure out what to do. Based on my 10+ years of experience as a baby sleep consultant, the average age to switch to one nap is around 14 months old. This post will help you decide when to switch your baby to one nap.

While newborns will sleep every 1-2 hours all day, most babies will be able to stay awake for 2-3 hours by 4-5 months old. And, most babies will take three naps until 8 months old, on average. That’s one reason the 8 months sleep regression is often more difficult because on top of the development going on, a nap transition is happening, too.

Once your baby is taking two naps a day, you can usually settle in for a great 2-nap schedule for several months. So, when do babies drop to one nap?

When Do Babies Drop From 2 Naps to One Nap?

Babies usually drop to one nap when they can stay awake comfortably for at least 4-5 hours both before a nap and after a nap. For most babies, this doesn’t happen until at least 12 months old but sometimes as early as 10 months. In my 10+ years as a sleep consultant, I’ve seen only a handful of 10-month olds truly transition to one nap.

However, because some babies and toddlers are also learning to walk around 12 months old, it’s not always the best time to switch to one nap. Newly walking toddlers can become overly exhausted and start waking at night again. Also, we sometimes see a temporary 12-month sleep regression at 11-12 months old. After this regression is over, babies will still take two naps for a couple more months.

Depending on what book you read, you might read that 12 months is a good time for babies to drop to one nap. Many daycares do it around this age, too. For some babies, this will work out just fine. However, if your baby is sensitive to being overtired and can’t stay awake for long periods of time, this can be a disaster! We have seen it many times over the years, unfortunately.

On the other hand, if your toddler is 18 months old and still taking two naps, you might be having problems with insomnia or early waking. How can you transition your toddler to one nap when they are waking up at 5:00 AM? More on that with the tips below.

Signs to Transition Baby to One Nap

There are a few definitive signs we look for before we switch a baby to one nap including:

  • Nighttime sleep decreasing below 10 hours.
  • Insomnia for 1.5-2+ hours at night several times a week.
  • Bedtime past 9 PM (unless your family has an intentionally late schedule.)
  • Skipping one of their naps 4 or more times a week.
  • Suddenly taking two 45-minute naps

Every situation is different so depending on what specific issues you are having, you may or may not want to drop to one nap but these are good signs it could be time. We do not expect to see ALL of these signs. It is more likely to be just one, maybe two, of them. Some babies will drop their morning nap and some will drop their second nap. In my experience, the most common way is to drop the second nap in the afternoon. Once that afternoon nap gets very late in the day, they often skip it.

How to Switch to One Nap

The big question is how to successfully switch to one nap. First, recognize that all nap transitions can be bumpy. And, nap transitions take 2-3 weeks, on average. If you’re having a hard time, it doesn’t mean it’s not the right thing to do. But, if your baby is still struggling after 2-3 weeks, you might want to make some changes.

5 tips to drop baby to one nap:

  1. Start delaying the morning nap by 15-30 minutes a day and then move all meals, the second nap, and bedtime 15-30 minutes later, too. You will do this even if your baby woke up early for the day. If your normal nap time is 9:00 AM, move it to 9:30 AM for the day. You can move the naps every day or every other day.
  2. Stop moving the morning nap once your toddler is staying awake for approximately 5 hours (and no more).
  3. Keep your baby in bed for at least two hours to help lengthen the nap. Once you transition to one nap, the nap should be 2-3 hours long.
  4. If the nap is shorter than two hours, move bedtime earlier but no earlier than 6:00 or 6:30 PM to guard against early waking.
  5. Offer two naps once or twice a week. Being on a 1-nap schedule for one day or a few days is one thing but every day is another. Many babies will start to get more and more overtired over a period of several days. Catch up for one day and then get back to the new schedule the next day.

Dropping to one nap can be challenging so expect it to be bumpy. Once your baby or toddler has adjusted, they will sleep 11-12 hours at night and 2-3 hours during the day, on average. But, what will their schedule look like after they transition to one nap?

What 1-Nap Schedule Should You Use?

The schedule to use with a baby or toddler taking one nap will depend on your baby’s age and how long they can comfortably stay awake between sleep periods. On average, the nap is approximately 5 hours after they wake up for the day and bedtime is 5 hours after they wake up from their nap. As they approach 18-24 months old, we see the awake period increase.

For a complete list of sample schedules, see our sample toddler schedules by month here!

I hope this post has helped you decide when a baby drops to one nap. Dropping from 2 naps to 1 nap isn’t always easy but your baby will adjust. If you have any questions, we’re here to help!


bss_ebook_freeguide_leftWant FREE sleep help that you can put to use right away? Download a copy of our free guide, 7 Common Napping Mistakes! The guide is available to download instantly, which means you can start using the techniques in it as early as today. So download now, and learn why your baby is not napping – and what you can do about it.

Click here to learn more about how to get your free guide.

A better daytime schedule could be just a few clicks away. So don’t wait – download now, and start your journey to better napping today!

The post When Do Babies Drop to One Nap? 5 Signs to See Before You Switch to One Nap appeared first on The Baby Sleep Site – Baby / Toddler Sleep Consultants.

When to Move Baby to a Crib and 5 Tips How to Transition0

When to Move a Baby to a CribWhen to move baby to a crib is 6 months old, on average. However, there are several factors to consider when deciding when to transition baby to a crib. This post will discuss these factors so you can decide the best time to move your baby to the crib and do it successfully. Let’s get to it!

Weight Limits of Bassinets

How long your baby sleeps in a bassinet will include a few factors, one of the biggest ones being their weight. Most bassinets have a weight limit that ranges from 15 to 35 pounds. Be sure to check your specific bassinet’s weight limit.

For example, the Arms Reach Bassinets all have an age recommendation of 5 months or when your child begins to push up on their hands and knees. Other bassinets have a suggested age and weight limit. For example, The CRZDEAL Bassinet suggests up to 6 months and no more than 30 pounds. Smaller bassinets often have a weight limit of 15-25 pounds, though. So you will want to be careful to check your specific bassinet’s limitations. Be sure to stop using a bassinet when your baby is too heavy for it.

Sharing a Room

Another thing to consider when deciding when to transition your baby to a crib is whether you plan to continue sharing a room. If your baby’s crib is too large to fit in your room, then moving them to a crib might also mean moving them to a room that’s separate from you. That’s a big step!

The AAP recommends sharing a room but not a sleep space “for at least 6 months but preferably a year.” Therefore, if your baby is not yet 6+ months and the crib is in another room from yours, you should consider keeping the baby in the room with you for a bit longer…as long as it’s safe to do so. If your baby is already 6+ months old then they may be ready to sleep in their own room.

Babies are loud sleepers, so if your baby is keeping you awake at night but doesn’t need your attention, consider wearing earplugs. With earplugs, you will still hear your baby crying but not be woken up with every noise.

You May Also Be Interested In…
3 Things to Do When Baby Won’t Sleep in a Bedside Bassinet
SNOO: Is It Worth It? And, alternatives.

Growth and Developmental Milestones

Even if your baby isn’t necessarily outgrowing the bassinet due to their weight, they might outgrow it developmentally. Some babies become mobile at a faster rate than other babies. That means they might be rolling over or pushing up on their hands and knees. One of my clients had a baby who started crawling at 6 months old. That’s very young!

(Note: If your baby isn’t mobile, try not to worry! My sons took a long time to crawl and now they are both teen athletes!)

So, when you’re considering when to move baby to a crib, consider that it can be unsafe if they can sit up in a bassinet or crawl off the side of a bed.

Comfort of the Bassinet

Keep in mind that some babies simply don’t like bassinets. My second son was one of them. No matter what I did, he wouldn’t sleep in it for even 5 minutes. I tried warming the surface and putting him all the way to sleep, etc. but he would simply NOT sleep there! He seemed to sleep in his crib just fine, though. To this day, I still can’t tell you what he didn’t like about the bassinet. Perhaps it was the thinner mattress or how small it was. It’s hard to say but if your baby doesn’t seem to like it, maybe it’s just the bassinet! Therefore, your baby won’t sleep in the bassinet long. Most babies, however, sleep in a bassinet until 4 to 6 months old and then start sleeping in a crib.

The Bottom Line: When Should You Move Baby to a Crib?

The bottom line is you should move your baby to a crib when it’s unsafe to keep them in their current sleep space. You might want to move your baby for other reasons and that’s okay, too! Every situation is unique and you know your baby best. If your baby is nearing the 3-4-month old mark, I recommend you start working toward it so you don’t feel rushed. Babies change fast!

Now that you know a little bit about how to choose when to move baby to a crib, let’s talk about HOW to transition them!

How to Transition to a Crib: 5 Tips

How you transition your baby to a crib will also include several factors to consider. Here are 5 tips to a successful transition to the crib using the acronym S.L.E.E.P.:

  1. Spend time in the crib – You don’t want your baby’s first experience in the crib to be trying to fall asleep. And, you don’t want them to be surprised when they wake up in a strange place. You want them to feel comfortable in their sleep space so first spend NON-sleep time in it. You can play peek-a-boo, put them in the crib while you put away laundry with music playing, or let them look at a mobile.
  2. Lay them on their backs for safest sleep. This reduces the risk of SIDS. We can’t always make them stay on their backs but that’s the way they should start.
  3. Empty the crib so there are no loose blankets or toys in the crib. It’s considered a safety hazard unless your baby is a year or older.
  4. Ease into it by doing short sleep periods at first. Assuming it’s safe for them to sleep in their previous sleep space, consider working your way up to all sleep periods in the crib. For example, you might start with one nap a day or just bedtime in the crib. Then, when they wake up, you can use the old sleep space. Over a period of a few days to a couple of weeks, you can work your way up to more sleep periods.
  5. Persist through tough times because quite a few of us reject something new. But, after a while, we ask ourselves “Why didn’t I do this sooner?” Your baby might not like the crib, at first. It’s similar to sleeping in a hotel the first night on vacation. At first, the bed just doesn’t feel like our own. Once your baby spends more and more time in the crib, it will feel just like theirs!

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How to Get Baby to Sleep in a Crib
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A Special Note for Co-Sleeping Families

If you are co-sleeping or bed-sharing, moving to a crib can be a much bigger step. Up until now, not only was your baby in a different bed, they were also snuggled up to you and, many times, breastfeeding on and off all night. In this scenario, we often build in a few smaller “baby steps” into our Personalized Sleep Plans®. We sometimes have to change sleep associations before we move the baby or toddler into the crib. This is because when you change more than one variable at a time (how they fall asleep AND where they sleep), it is often met with even more protest and crying. Many families will give up due to the very intense reaction. A slower process is often more successful for some families for this reason. You might be interested in reading our article, How to Gently Transition Your Baby From Co-sleeping.

Baby Keeps Waking Up in the Crib

If your baby keeps waking up when you put them in the crib, that may be an entirely different issue. Babies wake for many reasons, including sleep regressions, sleep associations, and more. Be sure to download our free e-Book, 5 Ways to Help Your Child Sleep Through the Night to get started on a better night’s sleep or 7 Common Napping Mistakes to fix those short naps!

The post When to Move Baby to a Crib and 5 Tips How to Transition appeared first on The Baby Sleep Site – Baby / Toddler Sleep Consultants.

Weighted Sleep Sack For Baby – Are They Safe and Do They Work?0

Weighted sleep sacks and weighted blankets are becoming more popular. Do you need a weighted sleep sack and will it help your baby sleep better? This post will explain what a weighted sleep sack is, the purpose, and discuss whether it will help your baby sleep better.

What Is a Weighted Sleep Sack and Its Purpose?

A weighted sleep sack is just as it sounds. It a form of sleep sack that has a little weight to it. But, why would a sleep sack need weight added to it?

These sleep sacks and blankets can calm your nervous system and help babies feel like a hand is on them. This gives them a feeling of reassurance by acting like a hug with a technique called deep pressure stimulation. Just like swaddling helps newborns sleep better, a weighted sleep sack can possibly help your baby sleep better, too. But, does it always work?

Will It Help Your Baby Sleep?

Swaddling your baby keeps your baby sleeping longer when their Moro reflex is strong. But, as your baby gets older and you stop swaddling, do you still need a special type of blanket?

Sleep sacks are safe ways to have a wearable blanket so your baby won’t suffocate. So, sleep sacks are definitely a great investment!

Does the sleep sack have to be weighted?

Not necessarily. A weighted sleep sack can help some babies sleep longer, however. Here are a few types of babies we find can possibly benefit from one:

  • If your baby likes when you put a hand on them.
  • Your baby seems fussy and/or nervous a lot.
  • Your baby still has the Moro reflex but is breaking out of the swaddle or doesn’t like to be swaddled.
  • You suspect your baby or toddler has sensory processing challenges.

Of course, as with many tools in your parenting toolbox, sometimes you just have to experiment to find what works for your baby! Many products may improve sleep but some sleep problems can’t be solved with sleepwear, of course. So, whether your baby sleeps better depends on the reasons your baby is waking in the first place.

Safety

Weighted sleep sacks are considered safe as long as the weight isn’t more than 10% of your baby’s body weight. So, if your baby is 10 pounds, the sleep sack should not surpass one pound. And, if your baby is 20 pounds then your sleep sack should not surpass two pounds. As a reminder, you should always choose products that meet or exceed the United States Consumer Product Safety Commission standards and have been tested for a multitude of harmful substances. Be sure to check the safety page on a company’s website for any product you use for your baby as well as check with your pediatrician since they know your baby best.

Dreamland Weighted Sleep Sack

I learned about the Dreamland Weighted Sleep Sack recently and they were kind enough to send me a couple of samples to review. These products are truly top-notch and packaged beautifully! The material is soft and it feels like a superior product compared to many of the sleepwear products out there. Of course, my first question with a newer product is whether it’s safe for your baby. This sleep sack is doctor-approved, exceeds CPSC standards, and is OEKO-TEX® certified. Dreamland Baby Co has a swaddle, sleep sack, and blanket option. The blanket was one of the best I’ve seen and I wanted to wrap myself into it right away! I come across many baby products and I can confidently recommend this one in a heartbeat.

Are you, or considering becoming, a VIP Member of The Baby Sleep Site®? Be sure to get your exclusive 10% OFF Dreamland Baby coupon when you log in to our <a href="https://members.babysleepsite.comVIP Members Area! Not a member? Join today!

Nested Bean Weighted Sleep Sack

There is one other sleep sack worth mentioning and that is the Nested Bean Gently Weighted Sleep Sack. This is weighted differently, however, with just a light weight on the chest. This mimics your hand on your baby’s chest which is soothing for some babies out there though not all. It’s a good alternative if your baby seems to like that a lot. These two products are different approaches to helping your baby sleep better so your baby’s preference will be a big indicator as to how well they each work (or not).

You might also be interested in: Nested Bean vs. Love To Dream Swaddle Up

In conclusion, a weighted sleep sack can be a good option for babies who are fussier and may need some added comfort. I certainly wish I had these products to try out with my son when he struggled with sleep! Of course, maybe then I wouldn’t have created this website. My goal is to help you solve your sleep problems much faster than I did and I hope this helps!

The post Weighted Sleep Sack For Baby – Are They Safe and Do They Work? appeared first on The Baby Sleep Site – Baby / Toddler Sleep Consultants.

How Much Should Your Baby Eat By Month – A Guide by The Baby Sleep Site®0

Hungry babies can’t sleep! How much should a 3 month old eat? How much should a 6 month old eat? No matter whether your baby is 4 months or 9 months, proper nutrition makes a healthier and happier baby. It also promotes a good night’s sleep and longer naps which is always welcome in this village! In my work as a sleep consultant for 10+ years, sometimes all I’ve done is adjust a baby’s feeding schedule and improved sleep so it can be an important aspect to better sleep. Use this guide to help you figure out how much your baby needs to eat by month.

Important Notes:

  • Feeding Frequency” is timed from the beginning of one feeding to the beginning of the next feeding. Newborns take longer to feed than older babies so it will make a bigger difference to newborn babies.
  • Babies are very good at self-moderation and will usually tell you if/when they need more.
  • Do not withhold feedings from the baby for fear of them “overeating.” Yes, they might spit-up but they don’t overeat in the same sense of adults over-indulging. Babies will start to learn how much they should eat in one sitting with practice and experience.
  • Your baby is unique and, by definition, some babies will fall above or below averages. Your baby’s weight gain and staying on their growth curve are the best indicators that your baby is eating enough.
  • This is not meant to be medical advice and you should always consult your baby’s pediatrician should you have questions or concerns about your unique baby.
  • You might want to bookmark this page so you can come back to it month-after-month

How Much Should Newborns Eat?

Newborns eat, poop, and sleep almost around the clock in the early days. Newborn babies should eat on demand every 1-2 hours at least until they regain their birth weight. However, during growth spurts, they often eat more frequently. Here are the average amounts for newborns:

Age Feeding Frequency Avg Length of Breastfeeding Sessions Avg Size Bottle of Breastmilk Avg Size Bottle of Formula Solid Foods
0-4 weeks every ~1.5-2 hours on-demand 20-45 minutes ~2-3 ounces / 60-90 ml ~2-4 ounces / 60-120 ml None

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Not sure about your newborn’s schedule? Use our Newborn Sleep Schedules by Week

How Much Should a 1 Month Old Eat?

1 month olds should eat on-demand every 2-3 hours around the clock, usually. However, babies with reflux often eat smaller, more frequent meals so if your 1 month old is spitting up quite a bit, you might need to offer smaller feedings.

Age Feeding Frequency Avg Length of Breastfeeding Sessions Avg Size Bottle of Breastmilk Avg Size Bottle of Formula Solid Foods
5-8 weeks every 2-3 hours on-demand ~20-30 minutes

~2-4 ounces / 60-120 ml ~4 ounces / 120 ml None

You May Also Be Interested In…

Is your baby fussy and eating every hour in the evening? Check out our blog post about Cluster Feeding.

Did your 6 week old’s sleep get worse? Check out 6 Week Sleep Regression or Growth Spurt?

How Much Should a 2 Month Old Eat?

2 month olds often eat every 2 1/2 to 3 hours. Some babies this age, however, graduate to eating every 4 hours. Parents who try to follow 12 Hours By 12 Weeks encourage this. It is said that babies who eat every 4 hours during the day will often sleep through the night earlier. Keep in mind, though, that we find this works more often for formula-fed babies. Most breastfed babies, in our experience, tend to eat every 3 hours, and sleeping through the night (for 11-12 hours, I mean) too early can negatively impact a mom’s milk supply.

Age Feeding Frequency Avg Length of Breastfeeding Sessions Avg Size Bottle of Breastmilk Avg Size Bottle of Formula Solid Foods
9-12 weeks every 2-4 hours ~10-20 minutes 3-4 ounces / 90-120 ml, incl 2-3 at night 4-6 ounces / 120-180 ml, incl 2 at night None

Average Total Per Day: 5-8 breastfeeding sessions, 20-25 ounces of breastmilk, or 20-30 oz of formula.

Please Note: If your baby is eating every 4 hours, it’s very likely their feedings will be larger. Breastfeeding babies eat 2-3 times at night while formula-fed babies eat 1-2 times at night, on average, at this age.

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2-Month Old Baby Sleep Guide

2 Month Old Sleep Schedule

How Much Should a 3 Month Old Eat?

3 month old babies should eat every 3-4 hours though there are a few babies, especially those with reflux, who still eat every 2 to 2 1/2 hours during the day. Keep in mind the more total ounces they consume during the day, the less they need at night. There are some babies who do best eating more frequently during the day so they can sleep in longer stretches at night.

Age Feeding Frequency Avg Length of Breastfeeding Sessions Avg Size Bottle of Breastmilk Avg Size Bottle of Formula Solid Foods
13-16 weeks every 2-4 hours 5-20 minutes 3-4 ounces / 90-120 ml, incl 2-3 at night 4-6 ounces / 120-180 ml, incl 0-2 at night None

Average Total Per Day: 5-8 breastfeeding sessions, 20-30 ounces of breastmilk, or 20-30 oz of formula.

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3 Month Old Sleep and Feeding Schedule

How Much Should a 4 Month Old Eat?

4 month old babies should eat every 3-4 hours but, again, some babies still eat every 2 to 2 1/2 hours if they take smaller feedings. This is not abnormal though it’s not as common in my 10+ years of experience as a sleep consultant. Of course, my son was one who still ate every 2 to 2 1/2 hours at this age. He did not take big feedings and that was just his preference. Here is how much your 4 month old should be eating:

Age Feeding Frequency Avg Length of Breastfeeding Sessions Avg Size Bottle of Breastmilk Avg Size Bottle of Formula Solid Foods
17-20 weeks every 2 1/2-4 hours 5-20 minutes 3-4 ounces / 90-120 ml, incl 2 at night 4-6 ounces / 120-180 ml, incl 0-2 at night None

Average Total Per Day: 5-8 breastfeeding sessions, 20-35 ounces of breastmilk, or 20-32 oz of formula.

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4 Month Old Sleep and Feeding Schedule

Did your baby suddenly start waking very frequently at night or taking short naps? Be sure to read 4 Month Sleep Regression: 20 Tips.

How Much Should a 5 Month Old Eat?

A 5 month old should eat every 3-4 hours during the day, including 1-2 times at night. Again, breastfeeding babies tend to feed more frequently and bottles tend to be smaller since breast milk is more concentrated than formula.

Age Feeding Frequency Avg Length of Breastfeeding Sessions Avg Size Bottle of Breastmilk Avg Size Bottle of Formula Solid Foods
5 months every 3-4 hours 5-20 minutes

3-4 ounces / 90-120 ml, incl 1-2 at night 6-7 ounces /180-210 ml, incl 0-1 at night None

Average Total Per Day: 5-8 breastfeeding sessions, 20-35 ounces of breastmilk, or 24-32 oz of formula.

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5 Month Old Sleep and Feeding Schedule

Thinking about starting solid foods soon? Be sure to read about when to start solids and how to introduce solid food.

How Much Should a 6 Month Old Eat?

6 month old babies drink milk every 3-4 hours and typically eat one solid meal a day if you’ve started solids. It’s important to note that starting solid food should NOT decrease milk intake during the day. If it does, you are likely offering too much solid food. Babies are good at moderating not to eat too much but solid food can leave them full too long to fit in all their milk feedings. The problem is fruits and vegetables aren’t high enough in calories and/or fat.

Age Feeding Frequency Avg Length of Breastfeeding Sessions Avg Size Bottle of Breastmilk Avg Size Bottle of Formula Solid Foods
6 months every 3-4 hours 5-20 minutes 4-5 ounces / 120-150 ml, incl 1-2 at night 6-7 ounces /180-210 ml, none at night* Up to 1-2 tablespoons each of baby cereal, fruit, and vegetables a day

Average Total Per Day: 5-6 breastfeeding sessions, 20-35 ounces of breastmilk, or 24-32 oz of formula.

* Please Note: Some formula-fed babies (especially those with reflux) still eat at night at this age but the majority of formula-fed babies can be night-weaned. If you are breastfeeding and considering supplementing with formula to help your baby sleep better, be cautious, and read our article Will Supplementing or Switching to Formula Help Your Breastfeeding Baby Sleep?.

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6 Month Old Sleep and Feeding Schedule

Not sure if your baby should be eating at night or how much? Use this Night Feedings by Age guide.

How Much Should a 7 Month Old Eat?

Your 7 month old is likely drinking milk every 3-4 hours during the day and eating one solid meal a day. Similar to 6 month olds, it’s important to note not to overdo it with solid food or your baby might start waking up at night again for a milk feeding they might have missed during the day.

Age Feeding Frequency Avg Length of Breastfeeding Sessions Avg Size Bottle of Breastmilk Avg Size Bottle of Formula Solid Foods
7 months every 3-4 hours 5-20 minutes 4-6 ounces / 120-180 ml, incl 1-2 at night 6-7 ounces /180-210 ml, none at night Up to 1-2 tablespoons each of baby cereal, fruit, vegetables, and dairy a day

Average Total Per Day: 5-7 breastfeeding sessions, 20-35 ounces of breastmilk, or 24-32 oz of formula.

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7 Month Old Sleep and Feeding Schedule

Considering meat and dairy? This is a common age. Check out our Types of Solid Food by Age Chart.

How Much Should an 8 Month Old Eat?

8 month olds are on the move and start becoming mobile! This can make it much harder for them to stop long enough to feed well throughout the day. We sometimes see a nighttime feeding creep back for that reason. Be cautious about allowing too much night feedings. Take the baby into a less interesting room or find a way to occupy them while they are feeding to encourage full feedings during the day as much as possible. 8 month olds should still be drinking milk every 3-4 hours and eat 2 solid meals a day.

Age Feeding Frequency Avg Length of Breastfeeding Sessions Avg Size Bottle of Breastmilk Avg Size Bottle of Formula Solid Foods
8 months every 3-4 hours 5-20 minutes 4-6 ounces / 120-180 ml, incl 0-1 at night 6-7 ounces /180-210 ml Up to 2-3 servings each of baby cereal, fruit, vegetables, and one serving of dairy and protein a day

Average Total Per Day: 5-6 breastfeeding sessions, 20-35 ounces of breastmilk, or 24-32 oz of formula.

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8 Month Old Sleep and Feeding Schedule

Is your baby waking frequently at night yet again? Be sure you’re ready for the 8 Month Sleep Regression!

How Much Should a 9 Month Old Eat?

Just like 8 month olds, 9 month old babies are often moving around a lot and some don’t tolerate being in their highchair multiple times a day. These are common frustrations for parents. Your baby should be getting milk every 3-4 hours plus 2-3 solid meals. Not every baby this age will eat solids three times a day. Again, it’s easy to overdo it with solid food and then find your baby is waking at night for a milk feeding they missed during the day. Fruits and veggies are very good for us but until your baby is eating more protein, too much solid food can make sleep worse at night.

Age Feeding Frequency Avg Length of Breastfeeding Sessions Avg Size Bottle of Breastmilk Avg Size Bottle of Formula Solid Foods
9 months every 3-4 hours 5-20 minutes 4-6 ounces / 120-180 ml, incl 0-1 at night 6-7 ounces /180-210 ml See Solid Food Chart

Average Total Per Day: 3-5 breastfeeding sessions, 20-35 ounces of breastmilk, or 24-32 oz of formula.

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9 Month Old Sleep and Feeding Schedule

Is your baby still not sleeping through the night? Be sure to download our free e-Book, 5 Ways to Help Your Child Sleep Through the Night!

How Much Should a 10 Month Old Eat?

10 month olds tend to start getting much more regular at sleeping through the night if they haven’t already. At this age, they are getting past their last sleep regression and eating a good number of calories during the day. 10 month olds drink milk 3-4 times a day and eat 3 solid meals. Some babies this age are also getting one snack, too.

Age Feeding Frequency Avg Length of Breastfeeding Sessions Avg Size Bottle of Breastmilk Avg Size Bottle of Formula Solid Foods
10 months every 3-4 hours 5-15 minutes 4-6 ounces / 120-180 ml, incl 0-1 at night 6-7 ounces /180-210 ml

Average Total Per Day: 3-4 breastfeeding sessions, 20-35 ounces of breastmilk, or 24-32 oz of formula.

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10 Month Old Sleep and Feeding Schedule

How Much Should a 11 Month Old Eat?

Your 11 month old should still drink milk 3-4 times a day, eat 3 solid meals a day, plus 1-3 snacks depending on their appetite and the size of their meals. Just like adults, some children like fewer, larger meals while others eat more frequent, smaller meals. To encourage sleeping through the night, we want to follow a schedule that will maximize caloric intake. If your baby’s stomach only holds so much food, making them wait longer between meals doesn’t work as well since they won’t eat more in total during the day. We want to balance the time between meals with when they will eat the most.

Age Feeding Frequency Avg Length of Breastfeeding Sessions Avg Size Bottle of Breastmilk Avg Size Bottle of Formula Solid Foods # of Night Feedings
11 months every 3-4 hours 5-15 minutes 4-6 ounces / 120-180 ml 6-7 ounces /180-210 ml See Solid Food Chart

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Average Total Per Day: 3-4 breastfeeding sessions, 20-35 ounces of breastmilk, or 24-32 oz of formula.

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11 Month Old Sleep and Feeding Schedule

How Much Should a 12 Month Old Eat?

A 12 month old will begin to eat more solid food and after 12 months old, we start to see milk become a beverage with a meal rather than a separate event. Of course, you don’t have to rush this if your toddler isn’t very interested in solid food. However, keep in mind that some children aren’t as interested in solid food until milk isn’t their primary source of nutrition. Some parents begin to re-balance the amount of solid food versus milk around this age. At 12 months old, toddlers will drink milk 3-4 times a day, eat 3 solid meals, and 1-3 snacks. In my experience, the amount of snacking varies based on whether your toddler eats a large meal or splits their intake among smaller meals.

Age Milk Frequency Avg Length of Breastfeeding Sessions Avg Size Bottle of Breastmilk Avg Size Bottle of Formula Solid Foods # of Night Feedings
12 months every 3-5 hours 5-15 minutes 4-6 ounces / 120-180 ml 6-7 ounces /180-210 ml See Solid Food Chart

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Average Total Per Day: 3-4 breastfeeding sessions, 20-35 ounces of breastmilk, or 24-32 oz of formula.

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12 Month Old Sleep and Feeding Schedule

Thinking about whether to transition to one nap? Not so fast! Be sure to read Why Not All 12 Month Olds Transition to One Nap.

This post was meant to guide you so you can feel more confident in how much your baby is eating. If you have any questions, we’re happy to help! Contact us at any time!

How Old Is Your Baby and How Much Is Your Baby Eating?

The post How Much Should Your Baby Eat By Month – A Guide by The Baby Sleep Site<sup>®</sup> appeared first on The Baby Sleep Site – Baby / Toddler Sleep Consultants.

What Should a Newborn Wear to Sleep?0

There are so many questions to answer when you first have a baby. And, we strive to answer all questions pertaining to sleep. Today, we share what a newborn should wear to sleep and what a newborn should sleep in.

How Much a Newborn Sleeps

Newborns sleep a lot. In fact, newborns sleep 14 to 17 hours a day but they can’t stay awake long between sleep periods. Your newborn might only stay awake for 1 to 2 hours throughout the day and night. Of course, you want most of their sleep to be at night with the 1 to 2 hours of awake time during the day. If your baby has newborn day/night confusion, you’re not alone!

If you are having any trouble with getting your newborn enough sleep, be sure to check our Newborn Sleep Schedules By Week.

What Should a Newborn Wear to Sleep?

To decrease your baby’s risk of SIDS, you want to make sure you dress your newborn appropriately. Overheating can increase the risk of SIDS so putting your newborn in appropriate sleep-wear is not only more comfortable but safer.

But, what should your newborn wear to sleep?

Of course, this will depend on your local climate, whether you have central heating and air conditioning, and what clothing you have available. The ideal room temperature for sleep is 68 to 70 degrees. Your baby’s skin should feel cool to the touch, not frigid, and never too warm or sweaty. If your baby feels very warm or sweaty, you are dressing your baby too warmly which is not as safe.

Most newborns should sleep in a maximum of 3 layers: a onesie, pajamas, and a swaddle blanket or wearable blanket.

A onesie is a little undershirt that has snaps on the bottom to make diaper changes easier. In some cases, if the onesie is long-sleeve, you might not need to put a sleep-n-play or pajamas over it. For babies who are warmer or in a warmer climate, skip the second layer and go straight to a swaddle blanket or sleep sack.

If your baby has sensitive skin or eczema, consider buying organic sleepwear whenever possible:

Do Newborns Have to Be Swaddled?

Most newborns sleep better when they are swaddled (wrapped up like a little burrito.) But, it isn’t mandatory. Some babies come out of the womb and want their freedom. Unfortunately, even if they don’t want to be swaddled, sometimes the moro reflex will wake them up constantly. For these babies, it’s better to swaddle them even if they appear not to like it.

My son, for example, would resist the swaddle but once he fell asleep, he slept much better. Some babies like mine just have FOMO.

If you are using a SNOO, it has a built-in swaddle to make it easier and keep baby safely on their back. Otherwise, you should use a good swaddle blanket and make sure your baby can’t break out making a safety hazard.

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SNOO: Is It Really Worth It? And, Alternatives.

What Do Newborns Wear If Not Swaddled?

If your newborn isn’t swaddled or when it’s time to stop swaddling, we recommend a sleep sack or wearable blanket. There are many on the market, so we’ve gathered the top 10 sleep sacks for you.

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Nested Bean vs. Love To Dream
Zipadee Zip vs. Love To Dream Swaddle Up

I hope this article has helped you decide what your newborn should wear to sleep. Be sure to also learn 15 Baby Sleep Facts New Parents Need to Know.

References:
https://www.childrenshospital.org/conditions-and-treatments/conditions/s/sudden-infant-death-syndrome-sids/symptoms-and-causes

The post What Should a Newborn Wear to Sleep? appeared first on The Baby Sleep Site – Baby / Toddler Sleep Consultants.

Newborn Bedtime Routines and Time to Put Baby to Bed0

A good bedtime routine can help your newborn baby sleep better at night and take longer naps. But, what is a good bedtime routine for a newborn and when should you start using one? And, what time do you put your newborn to bed? This post will share all you need to know about bedtime routines for your newborn.

Newborn Bedtime Routine Ideas

Bedtime routines will change over time as your baby goes from newborn to young baby to a toddler or preschooler. The best bedtime routines typically have a few things in common. Good bedtime routines start and end the same way, are consistent, and most of all, they are soothing.

A bedtime routine, especially for your newborn, does not have to be very long or complicated. Most bedtime routines are ~10 minutes at nap time and ~20-30 minutes at bedtime. Here is a sample bedtime routine:

  1. Give the baby a bath.
  2. Apply some lotion with lavender for calming comfort.
  3. With the lotion, do a little baby massage.
  4. Put on a clean diaper (if you are not doing Elimination Communication).
  5. Put on your baby’s onesie and pajamas.
  6. Turn on white noise.
  7. Swaddle your newborn safely and snugly.
  8. Feed and burp your baby.
  9. Rock or sway gently for a few minutes and lay them down on their back in their bassinet, bedside bassinet, or crib.
  10. Soothe them while in their bed, if necessary, to get them to fall the rest of the way to sleep.

At first, your baby won’t know this is a routine but when you do this consistently for enough days in a row, it will cue them to fall asleep easier and faster.

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SNOO: Is It Really Worth It? And, Alternatives.

Can You Do a Newborn Bedtime Routine Without a Bath?

Some parents find that their baby is not soothed by a bath. Some babies don’t like them while others like them a little too much, and then don’t like to get out. Both of my boys got very hyper when they took a bath!

Also, keep in mind that we all sleep best when our body temperature is lower. A warm bath can increase our body temperature and make it take longer to fall asleep.

So, feel free to do your baby’s bedtime routine but without the bath. You can do a bath earlier in the day or you can consider wiping your baby down with a warm, damp cloth instead.

Until your baby is older and moving around, they aren’t accumulating much dirt to need a bath every day. And, in fact, it can dry out their skin considerably. And, if your baby has eczema, it’s not a good idea to use soap every day.

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FREE e-Book: 15 Baby Sleep Facts New Parents Should Know

When Do You Start a Bedtime Routine for Baby?

At what age should you start a bedtime routine for your newborn? It doesn’t hurt to start from birth but until your baby can stay awake for longer periods of time, it might feel like all you have time for is a feeding and diaper change before your baby is falling asleep, again!

In the early days, newborns don’t stay awake very long. Sometimes they stay awake for only 45-60 minutes at a time! Most newborns stay awake 1-2 hours TOPS.

There is no right or wrong age to start a bedtime routine but we encourage them as early as 4 to 6 weeks old. Until then, your baby might not need anything special to fall asleep since many newborns are so sleepy in the first place.

Time to Put Newborns to Bed

As your newborn’s day/night confusion goes away, they will start to stay awake for longer periods of time during the day. They will take naps and it might start to feel like daytime is now distinct from the nighttime. This is the time we start to think about setting a specific “bedtime.”

When you decide on the time to put your newborn to bed, you must keep in mind that newborns often only sleep 8-10 hours at night (on and off with feedings). During this time of day, they will sleep consecutively waking only for feedings and then go right back to sleep. During the day, they will stay awake for 45-90 minutes at a time, on average.

The last thing you want is for your baby to stay awake from 2:00 to 3:00 a.m., take a 1-hour “nap,” and then stay awake again from 4:00 to 5:00 a.m.

Therefore, you want to set your newborn’s bedtime to be late around 10:00 or 11:00 p.m. That way, if they sleep 9 hours, it will be from 10:00 p.m. to 7:00 a.m., for example. Be sure to put your newborn on a schedule based on their age in weeks.

Bedtime Routine for a Toddler and Newborn

If you have both a toddler and a newborn, the bedtime routines can be a bit more challenging depending on the age of your toddler.

If you have a 12-18-month-old and a newborn, your toddler might be too distracting and unable to be quiet while you put your newborn to bed. For that reason, I recommend you put your toddler to bed first and then your newborn later. If your newborn’s bedtime is still late, this should be easy to do. You can put your newborn in a sling or wrap if they are fussy and need to be held a lot. If your baby is content, you can consider putting them in a bouncer and give your toddler more individualized attention.

If you have a 2-year old or 3-year old, your toddler might be better able to help put the baby to bed if the time to put your newborn to bed has moved to earlier than your toddler’s bedtime. If this is the case, ask your toddler to help such as getting the diaper, helping with the baby massage, etc.

If both your toddler and newborn are going to bed around the same time, you can try combining the bedtime routines but you will need to allow for extra time (~30-60 minutes). Toddlers can delay things quite a bit. Here is a sample combined bedtime routine for a toddler and newborn:

Sample Bedtime Routine With a Toddler and Newborn

  1. Undress one child at a time and apply some lotion with lavender for calming comfort.
  2. With the lotion, do a little baby massage.
  3. Put on a clean diaper (if you are not doing Elimination Communication).
  4. Put on your baby’s onesie and pajamas for both.
  5. Place the baby in a bouncer and read books to both children (usually with your toddler in your lap so they can see the pictures).
  6. Have your toddler get in bed and turn on lullaby music and white noise.
  7. Swaddle your newborn safely and snugly.
  8. Feed and burp your baby while chatting with your toddler.
  9. Tell your toddler good night, turn off the light, and leave the room.
  10. Rock or sway the baby gently for a few minutes and lay them down on their back in their bassinet, bedside bassinet, or crib.
  11. Soothe them while in their bed, if necessary, to get them to fall the rest of the way to sleep.

I hope this post has given you all the tools you need to create the best bedtime routine for your family!

Newborn Baby Sleep Help That Works

Essential Keys to Newborn SleepNeed help encouraging your newborn to sleep better, and to sleep longer stretches at night and during the day? We have a great resource designed to do just that. Check out Essential Keys to Your Newborn’s Sleep, an e-Book from The Baby Sleep Site®. Available in PDF format as well as a variety of e-reader formats, Essential Keys to Your Newborn’s Sleep is the tired parents’ #1 newborn resource. Essential Keys lays out everything you need to know about helping your baby to sleep better right from the start. It also includes information on feeding (both breast and bottle), baby communication, bonding with baby, daily routines, sample sleep schedules, and more. Download your copy today!

Or, if you are interested in personalized, one-on-one help for your newborn, why not consider one of our personalized sleep consulting packages? Our consultations allow you to work directly with one of our expert sleep consultants, and to get a Personalized Sleep Plan® that will work for your family.

First, browse our extensive list of package options and select the one that looks best for your situation.
 
Browse our list of consultation package options here.
 

Once you make your choice and purchase, you will immediately receive an e-mail with your Helpdesk login information. You’ll be able to log in and start your family’s sleep history questionnaire right away – it’s that simple!

The post Newborn Bedtime Routines and Time to Put Baby to Bed appeared first on The Baby Sleep Site – Baby / Toddler Sleep Consultants.

Colic in Baby: 5 Tips to Help Your Newborn Sleep0

When your baby has colic, they will cry for hours on end and it’s very hard to calm them down. What are the signs and symptoms of colic? And, how can you help a colicky baby sleep? This post will tell you all you need to know based on our 10+ years of experience.

What is Colic?

Colic is a fairly predictable time of day when your baby will cry for long periods of time. Some babies will cry for an hour or two but other babies can cry for multiple hours. My friend’s baby cried for 5-6 hours every day!

The most challenging part about colic is that it’s impossible to soothe the baby and stop the crying. When a colicky baby is crying, it comes on unexpectedly and for no apparent reason. You can’t simply change a diaper, for example.

The word ‘colic’ is used to label a healthy baby who cries for long periods of time every day for weeks on end. There has been a movement to share with parents and caregivers that all babies will go through a period of increasing crying. It’s just that some babies have much more of it (and labeled with colic) and other babies have much less of it (not labeled as colicky). It is called The Period of PURPLE Crying. Diagnosing a baby with colic implies that some babies have it and others don’t. However, according to Dr. Ronald Barr, a Developmental Pediatrician and World Expert on Infant Crying, all babies go through this period, some simply easier than others. Those who do not get labeled with colic simply have newborn evening fussiness.

Colic Signs and Symptoms for Baby

The most common signs and symptoms of colic include the following:

  • Baby cries for a long period of time (2-3 hours or more).
  • The crying is predictable every day. For example, your baby cries for 3 hours from ~7:00 to ~10:00 p.m. every night.
  • Crying is usually in the evening.
  • Baby looks like they are in pain when they are crying.
  • Soothing doesn’t seem to help.

What Causes Colic?

Nothing causes colic so much as all babies will have this period of a gradual increase of crying until it peaks. This is a developmental period and a phase that will pass, eventually. The crying starts spontaneously every day and then stops just as quickly as it started.

This time period can be very frustrating and you might doubt yourself as a parent. But, this is not a reflection on your parenting skills and there are no long-lasting effects from all of the crying.

There are some theories that a baby can get overstimulated adjusting to the outside world but there has been no definitive cause as to why some babies have longer periods of crying than others.

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When Does Colic Start?

Colic for your baby starts around 2 weeks old. Crying will gradually increase over the next days/weeks until it peaks. At what age the crying peaks varies from baby to baby. For some babies, it will peak at 3 weeks while others can still cry for hours each day until 2 to 3 months old.

When Does Colic End? How Long Does Colic Last?

Thankfully, colic will end, eventually, even though it will feel like an eternity!

Once your baby’s colic peaks, the crying will gradually reduce over a period of days/weeks and end by 3 to 4 months old. Therefore, colic lasts 1 to 12 weeks and it’s impossible to know how long your baby will have it.

We do know, however, that there is often a 6 week peak of fussiness. After this, many babies will gradually fuss and cry less over the next few weeks. For my son, this was exactly true and he was much less fussy by 8 to 10 weeks old!

How Do You Know Baby Is Not Sick?

When your baby has colic, there is a pattern of crying meaning it happens every day at the relatively same time of day. Since this pattern of crying will last weeks or months, your doctor will rule out health issues and diagnose your baby with colic.

If your baby is sick, there will probably be other things going on such as diarrhea, vomiting, fever, weight loss, not feeding, etc.

Because you won’t know if your baby is showing a pattern of crying from colic for a number of weeks, it is very important to have your doctor do tests and examine your baby just in case it is a medical condition. Your doctor needs to rule out other reasons for the crying first and foremost.

Colic Remedies: How to Soothe a Baby with Colic?

Unfortunately, the definition of colic includes precisely that your baby is crying for long periods of time and cannot be soothed. I’m going to be honest here. Therefore, the ways you soothe a baby with colic will not likely be very successful. However, few parents can sit back and do nothing while their baby is crying.

As usual, I recommend you make a plan for how you will handle your newborn every day when the crying starts.

If you have help, I highly recommend you take turns, too. For example, if you know your baby will cry for 3 hours beginning around 6:30 p.m. every day, you can plan to let your spouse go for a walk or take a bath in another part of the house for the first 30-60 minutes while you take the first shift. During the second hour, you can switch places.

If you don’t have help, you can plan to try soothing the baby for 30 minutes, use a swing for 30 minutes, put on headphones for 30 minutes while walking the baby around the kitchen, and so on. If you know what you will do every day, you can reduce some of the frustration that comes with expecting you’ll be able to stop the crying. Accept the baby will cry and simply follow your “protocol” to get through it.

But, what about the baby? How can you soothe the baby? Here are a few things you can try:

Need help with your newborn baby's sleep? Contact Us Today!

Don’t feel bad taking a break!

Obviously, some parents get very frustrated hearing their baby cry for such long periods of time every day. This is understandable! It’s always best to take a break rather than possibly hurt your baby. Put your baby down in a safe place in another room for 10 to 15 minutes if you need a break. It won’t hurt the baby and you can regroup. After all, your senses can get overstimulated, too!

5 Tips to Help Your Colic Baby Sleep Better

If there’s any chance that over-stimulation increases colic, it will help you and your baby to help them sleep better. No, we can’t get rid of all crying nor can we “fix” colic but helping your baby sleep better will recharge you during the day. If you’re lucky, you can nap during the day so you have more patience in the evening.

Here are 5 tips to help your newborn sleep better:

  • Swaddle Your Baby – The benefits of swaddling are clear and can help calm a fussy baby. Be sure to swaddle the correct way for maximum positive impact.
  • Use White Noise – Using white noise can help your baby drown out noises in the house. If your baby is easily over-stimulated, this should help calm them. The volume should be about that of a shower running so you may need to turn it up.
  • Wear Your Baby – Using a baby wrap and simulating your newborn back in the womb can do wonders. Make sure you check the weight for the wrap you use so it’s safe. Many babies will snooze in a sling or wrap.
  • Don’t keep your baby awake too long – The easiest way to over-stimulate the baby is to keep them awake too long. Babies are taking in so much around them. Therefore, many babies can only stay awake 45-60 minutes at a time until they are older. Be sure to use an appropriate newborn schedule by week.
  • Offer Skin-to-Skin Contact – The benefits of skin-to-skin contact are plentiful but the biggest benefit for the purposes of soothing a baby with colic is to help regulate their heart and breathing with yours. Kangaroo Care has been shown to have many benefits to your baby and to you. And, the best part is that any caretaker can do it!

I hope this article has helped you understand colic better and, most importantly, helped you feel less alone. And, I hope that you now know that this is not a reflection on your parenting skills. It’s simply a test of your patience.

Newborn Baby Sleep Help That Works

Essential Keys to Newborn SleepNeed help encouraging your newborn to sleep better, and to sleep longer stretches at night and during the day? We have a great resource designed to do just that. Check out Essential Keys to Your Newborn’s Sleep, an e-Book from The Baby Sleep Site®. Available in PDF format as well as a variety of e-reader formats, Essential Keys to Your Newborn’s Sleep is the tired parents’ #1 newborn resource. Essential Keys lays out everything you need to know about helping your baby to sleep better right from the start. It also includes information on feeding (both breast and bottle), baby communication, bonding with baby, daily routines, sample sleep schedules, and more. Download your copy today!

Or, if you are interested in personalized, one-on-one help for your newborn, why not consider one of our personalized sleep consulting packages? Our consultations allow you to work directly with one of our expert sleep consultants, and to get a Personalized Sleep Plan® that will work for your family.

First, browse our extensive list of package options and select the one that looks best for your situation.
 
Browse our list of consultation package options here.
 

Once you make your choice and purchase, you will immediately receive an e-mail with your Helpdesk login information. You’ll be able to log in and start your family’s sleep history questionnaire right away – it’s that simple!

The post Colic in Baby: 5 Tips to Help Your Newborn Sleep appeared first on The Baby Sleep Site – Baby / Toddler Sleep Consultants.

Zipadee Zip vs Nested Bean Zen Sleep Sack – Which Is Best for Better Sleep?0

The Zipadee Zip vs Nested Bean – both the Zipadee Zip Swaddle Transition Sleep Sack and the Nested Bean Sleep Sack are great products. But, do you need both? Is one better than the other for your baby’s sleep?

In this blog post, you’ll learn about both products and which we recommend!

Zipadee Zip Swaddle Transition Sleep Sack

zipadeezipWe have been recommending the Zipadee Zip for a long time even before they were on the Shark Tank. The Zipadee Zip, created by a company named Sleeping Baby, is a really great invention to help your baby sleep better when it’s time to stop swaddling.

The “wings” of the Zipadee Zip stop your baby from feeling like they are falling when the Moro reflex is still strong. Many babies are ready to transition away from the swaddle before the Moro reflex has gone away, which is where the Zipadee Zip shines. It is safe for sleeping especially when a baby is rolling over and otherwise can’t be swaddled. And, it’s also good for when your baby doesn’t like to be swaddled, yet can’t seem to stay asleep without it.

If your baby has eczema or otherwise scratches herself, the Zipadee Zip will protect the skin. I was always terrible at keeping my baby’s fingernails clipped!

There are many different styles to choose from for the Zipadee Zip. And, although you won’t need the wings as your baby gets older, so many babies like this sleep sack that they make toddler sizes as well!

Nested Bean Sleep Sack

The Nested Bean products are very innovative with the simple premise that sometimes you just need a hand on you to feel comfort. That’s what their lightly-weighted products emulate: the feeling of a parent’s hand on your baby. Of course, there’s no perfect replacement for your hand but it’s a great concept!

While Nested Bean has a few different products, the one you’d compare to the Zipadee Zip would be the Zen Sack which is a sleep sack you use after you’re done swaddling.

The Nested Bean Zen Sack has a 2-way zipper and is lightly weighted with non-toxic poly beads to give just the right amount of pressure on your baby’s chest. Or, you can flip it over if your baby is a tummy sleeper though Back is Best to reduce the risk of SIDS. This sleep sack is made with 100% soft, breathable cotton with a 0.5 TOG. This means it’s lightweight which is very versatile.

Zipadee Zip vs Nested Bean Sleep Sack – Which is Better?

Both the Zipadee Zip and the Nested Bean Sleep Sack are great sleep sacks. But, which is better for your baby’s sleep?

We have worked with families who have used both and clients love both products. As a sleep consultant for over 10 years, I can tell you that either product would be a good choice. We give the edge to the Zipadee Zip simply because many babies won’t sleep better with the “hand on the chest” concept. Most of the babies with which we work need to be picked up to be soothed. We do love the concept but it only seems to “work” for some babies. Therefore, it simply functions as a regular sleep sack. There’s nothing wrong with that, of course, but if the weight doesn’t “work” it loses its special-ness. Therefore, we highly recommend the Zipadee Zip for many babies, but there are a few things to consider first:

  1. Does your baby use a pacifier?
  2. Does your baby like to suck on their thumb, fingers, or hands?
  3. Does your baby like to crawl around while self-settling to sleep?

If you answered no to all of these questions, the Zipadee Zip is an excellent choice!

However, if you answered yes to any of these questions, the Zipadee Zip may or may not be the best sleep sack for your baby. And, for that reason, you might choose Nested Bean or another sleep sack. We have a list of the Top 10 Best Sleep Sacks here.

Baby Likes to Suck on Thumb, Fingers, or Hands

If your baby likes to suck on their thumb, fingers, or hands, it may work out fine. Some babies will simply suck their hands through the cloth of the wings. But, if your baby likes to really feel their fingers or thumb inside their mouth mimicking a nipple, this might not work out very well. Some babies will adapt while others will struggle. This can lead to excessive crying during sleep training.

Baby Has a Pacifier

Some babies suck on their pacifier as they fall asleep but then don’t need it again. That would make using the Zipadee Zip work out just fine.

However, some babies struggle with self-settling when they can’t maneuver their own pacifier. We want your baby to be able to wake up between sleep cycles, find their own pacifier, and pop it back in. For these babies, we’d recommend a sleep sack with hands out such as the Zen Sack or the Bitta Kidda with a built-in lovey attached.

Baby Likes to Crawl Around or Stand Up

If your baby likes to crawl around the crib as they are self-soothing or stand in the crib, they may prefer to keep their hands free. We haven’t heard many complaints about the Zipadee Zip in this regard, so it’s a minor issue but depending on your baby, it is something to consider.

Zipadee Zip vs Nested Bean – Which to Buy?

If you still don’t know which product to buy and can’t afford to try both, I highly recommend you start with the Zipadee Zip. This is based on over 10 years of working with families and getting reports about which products their babies love. I know based on the experience of many families that your baby is most likely going to LOVE it!

Of course, your baby’s sleepwear is only one variable that impacts your baby’s sleep. And, that’s what we do here at The Baby Sleep Site!

The post Zipadee Zip vs Nested Bean Zen Sleep Sack – Which Is Best for Better Sleep? appeared first on The Baby Sleep Site – Baby / Toddler Sleep Consultants.

How To Handle Your Baby Standing In the Crib and Won’t Sleep0

Baby Standing In CribIf your baby is standing in the crib, it’s likely they aren’t sleeping. Babies and toddlers of all ages stand up in the crib and cry sometimes. In this article, you will learn when standing in the crib starts and how to handle it.

When Do Babies Start Standing in the Crib?

On average, babies start standing in the crib during the 8 month sleep regression. This is when babies become much more mobile, in general. Some babies might learn the skill early around 6 to 7 months old while others might not learn until 9 to 10 months old. All babies develop on their own timetable. If you ever have concerns about your baby’s development, be sure to talk to your baby’s doctor.

Baby Standing In Crib and Won’t Sleep

When babies are standing in the crib, they tend not to be sleeping. Do they do this on purpose?

Sometimes. And, sometimes it’s instinctual.

When they are learning a new skill, babies often “practice” in their sleep. It’s something they can’t control and when they are first learning to stand around 8 to 9 months old, it can be exhausting. They might be crying in the crib and unable to get back down. This can disrupt their sleep to the point where they wake very frequently at night. And, sometimes they stop napping or taking short naps, too!

Once they are older and the skill is no longer new, your baby or toddler could be standing in the crib due to frustration or their schedule needs to change.

If your 1 year old is standing up in the crib, for example, it might be time to add more awake time before their naps. Be sure to use an appropriate 1 Year Old / 12 month schedule. Most 12 month olds can still take a nap after being awake just 2-3 hours while others have graduated to 3-4 hours.

There are many reasons a baby isn’t sleeping so depending on how new the skill is will determine whether standing is the reason they won’t sleep or merely a method to avoid sleeping. We handle each differently.

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How To Help a Standing Baby Sleep Better

So, how do you help your baby or toddler sleep better when they are standing in the crib?

Most babies will learn quickly how to get back down pretty quickly. My two boys learned this within 1-2 weeks of learning how to stand. Since they learn this quickly, if they aren’t crying, try not to give baby standing in the crib too much attention.

But, because they can fall and hit their heads, it’s a good idea to have some type of strategy to follow. Here are a few tips:

  • Practice – During NON-sleep times, be sure you have your baby practice the skill of getting back down. For example, stand your baby at a couch or sofa. Then, put a toy on the ground next to them. Help them bend their knees to reach the toy. Baby squats! It will become second-nature in no time!
  • Allow Some Practice Time in the Crib – Even if they are getting good at this out in the common areas, they may find it novel to be awake in the crib and want to practice this skill. Put them down a little earlier for naps temporarily to allow them to practice for a while. Then, soothe them and encourage them to lay down closer to the time you expect them to fall asleep.
  • Sleep Training – Once you feel more confident your baby knows how to get down on their own, you can use sleep training to break any habits. You may need to change your strategy a little bit, however. We typically instruct parents to lay their babies down periodically rather than constantly. For example, you might lay them down every 8-10 minutes, allowing some space to figure it out on their own but without letting them skip their naps and get more overtired.

As with most sleep regressions and phases, they do end, eventually. The key is not to make new habits you will have to break. To get through 3 weeks of difficulty, some families are having sleep problems for months. Short-term sleep deprivation is challenging but if you put a bit more work in up-front, you will ALL be sleeping more in a couple of weeks!

You may also be interested in:

How old was your baby when they started standing in the crib?

The post How To Handle Your Baby Standing In the Crib and Won’t Sleep appeared first on The Baby Sleep Site – Baby / Toddler Sleep Consultants.